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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States

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This was late last night, but I finished this one. It's real rough and I was simply done with it. It's just a practice piece for plunge cuts, ricassos, and general fit up with bolsters and such.

 

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

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Gotta do that of you want to make proper swords and other historical items. B)

 

As for me, started a four day class with Mark Aspery...

 

 

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Doing some more skill building. Practicing ricassos, plunges, and 4 sided shoulders.

 

 

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

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Posted (edited)

Looks like a good start on the W's, @Conan Dunlap!

Here's how the chef's knife turned out: 52524.jpg

Blade length: 8-1/2" (220mm)

Height @ heel:  2" (51mm)

Spine thickness @ heel: 0.095" (2.4mm)

I'm hoping to get Coop to take a picture of the top side.  I like how the powder turned out, especially at the tip.  To me it looks like a mountain over a lake.  Maybe I'll call this one Ansel Adams.
Have a good rest of the week, all.  

 

Edited by billyO
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RIP Bear....be free!

 

as always

peace and love

billyO

 

 

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4 hours ago, billyO said:

I'm hoping to get Coop to take a picture of the top side.  I like how the powder turned out, especially at the tip.  To me it looks like a mountain over a lake.
Have a good rest of the week, all.  

 

I think it looks great, and I bet Coop could snap a real nice sharp photo for you! ;) Go for it!

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Looks like a North German two horn pattern Kohlswa? Never seen one of those, even though I knew they existed.  What's the weight?

 

As for me, four-day class with Mark Aspery ended yesterday.  I took it because if he's teaching in your area it'd be stupid not to go!  Class emphasis was on forge welding and upsetting, with three projects.

 

First was a fire poker made from several parts in which a basket handle was welded from two pieces of 1/4" round, a collar weld of 3/8" square on the end, a shaft of 3/8 square welded to the other end of basket, point and barb forged from 1/4" x 3/4" flat bar in which the point was forged, a 1" long section of undisturbed 3/4" was left for the barb, and the rest drawn out to 3/8" square. The barb was upset from the 1/4 x 1 x 3/4" tab, then the whole thing was welded to the shaft which was then tapered from 1/4" square at the barb to 3/8" square at the basket.  As one participant put it, "This seems like we're doing this the hardest possible way!" to which Mr. Aspery replied "Yes, that's the idea." 

 

Second project was a gate latch of 3/8" round. The barb on the hook is a type of jellyroll weld in which the end of the bar was given a very short taper and notched lengthwise on the edge of the anvil, then nicked and folded over twice.  The idea is that the short tapered wedge when folded in becomes the wedge shape of the barb, with the thick edges of the notch acting as filler on the sides which you wouldn't get from just folding and welding the round bar. The rest of the hook is just precision bending that would be simple with an oxy-fuel torch, but was done in a coal forge.  The hasp without backplate (that's our homework assignment) is a staple with tenons forged on the end to fit a pair of 1/4" holes 1.25" apart, and the drive staple has the pointy bits forged on the diamond, which allows you to draw the points sharper after the staple is bent. Make sure to leave one leg about 1/8" longer than the other to aid in starting to drive it into the post.

 

Final project is a hacksaw frame forged from an 8" bar of 1/4" x 1.5" flat bar. First make a punch mark at 7/8" from one end and 1.75" from the other end. Forge the bar ends to a half-octagon profile, then upset the bar at each punch mark to be 1/8" wider than the parent bar. Set down the 1.75" end of the bar to form a tab that measures about 1" wide x 1/4" thick. Chisel a slot from punch mark to punch mark, punch a 1/4" hole at each end of the slot, taking care to capture the very end of the chisel cut, then make a chisel cut at 1.5" from the end of the slot on the side where the 1" tab is to creat an opening from the outside edge to the slot.  Unfold the long end and forge to a 1/2" x 1/4" flat bar, cleaning up the bevels from the chisel cuts by upsetting them back into the parent bar.  Then unfold the short end to be at right angles to the bar. Cut the short end of the T thus formed to be 3/4" long, then upset that to 1/2" long. Hot rasp and file round, then saw a slot longways to hold the blade. Bend the frame to look like a saw frame that will take 10" blades. Put blade in slotted end and adjust bends until it fits with 1/8" to go, cut off excess from far end, if any.  Round far end with files, cut slot for blade.  Draw out tang to fit a file handle. Done!  Homework on this is to drill a 1/8" hole at the tang end and pin the blade on with a 1/8" rivet. Drill the hole at the far end 1/8" too far away, then insert the blade, bend the frame until the blade can be pinned, and let go. Add file handle, instant hacksaw. In about six hours' work, that is.

 

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As you can see, I got the poker a bit wonky at the basket/shaft junction. This called for a drop-the-tongs weld and I didn't have my anhydrous borax/cast iron powder with me and it took eight attempts to nail it with plain 20-mule-team.  I brought my mix the next day and never had a welding issue again, nor did anyone else who used my flux.  

 

This doesn't look like a lot of product for four days of work, but trust me, it was not easy!  One fun thing is that part of the assignment on the gate latch and the saw frame was that there be no obvious hammer marks on the finished product.  This is a holdover from the days when everything was hand forged. Nowadays we like to see the hammer marks as proof of a hand made item. Back in the day, though, proof of excellent workmanship was no visible evidence it was made by hand.  Kind of like what we try to do with most of our stuff, brut-de-forge excepted.  Nine people in the class, three of whom were bladesmiths. Guess who produced the most mark-free work... B)

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5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

As for me, four-day class with Mark Aspery ended yesterday.

 

Looks like it was an intense class. Those projects look good. I know for sure the gate latch is part of the ABANA curriculum. 

 

I've been working on a handful of friction folding knives. I got 2 more forged yesterday along with a blade for practicing making take down style knives. Everything I've made recently had been a partial tang or friction folders. This is probably the nicest one out of the bunch.

 

IMG_20240529_142229_932_copy_768x960.jpg

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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19 hours ago, Bob Ouellette said:

Looks like it was an intense class.

 

It was!  Especially since I've been too busy to do much forging since January.  But the elbow held up, so I was happy.

 

19 hours ago, Bob Ouellette said:

I know for sure the gate latch is part of the ABANA curriculum. 

 

Yes indeed.  So's the poker.  The hacksaw frame is not, but will be in Aspery's Book 5.  Had I been a member of ABANA, he offered to sign off on my certification as a level one instructor of the curriculum, but I'm not a member, so there.  

 

19 hours ago, Bob Ouellette said:

This is probably the nicest one out of the bunch.

 

Very nice indeed!  Is the knot applied, or chased? Looks applied, just asking.  I like it.

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9 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Very nice indeed!  Is the knot applied, or chased? Looks applied, just asking.  I like it.

 

Thank you! It's applied and lightly chased, just to give it the over/under look. It reminded me how much I dislike using jeweler's saws. I might do more things like it. I have some brass shim I think would look good on copper or steel handles.

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

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Posted (edited)

Yesterday was a rare day where I was able to do some hobbying. I did a bit of casting and forging. My daughter had asked me earlier to play around with the casting sand, so we prepared some molds, including some of her My little pony's :)

 

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In the mean time I did a bit of forging. I had a fragment of undetermined pleistocene bone (mammoth or other animal) that I found on the beach, and thought it would be fun using it for a knife. I forged, rough finished and heat treated the blade the same afternoon (with casting in between. I've started on the bone knife scales. The knife is based on a dutch find that is dated 725-900AD, but I sincerely doubt that dating is correct. Still a fair bit of work left to do, and cutting out the second hilt plate.

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It's probably a lot later then that. Anyway, it's not meant to be a historic reproduction, ust something I used as an example to work from. I was also forging another knife, but I accidentally burned up the handle, so that's a loss. It's good practicing accurate forging again. It's something I've not done much for many years, and I'm finding it quite a challenge again.

 

And in the morning we made scones :)

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Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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10 hours ago, Jeroen Zuiderwijk said:

Yesterday was a rare day where I was able to do some hobbying....

And in the morning we made scones

Sounds and looks like it was a great day!  
Thanks for sharing

RIP Bear....be free!

 

as always

peace and love

billyO

 

 

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On 1/11/2024 at 8:59 AM, Jeroen Zuiderwijk said:

New charcoal has arrived. Fortunately professional cooks demand consistent quality charcoal of known wood types. That will give more certainty that if it's good, I'll have a reliable source for casting I can depend on. And it's not a lot more expensive fortunately.

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The new charcoal is a success b.t.w.! Tested with the castings and forging last sunday, it gets the heat and burns clean. I actually burned away one of the knives I was forging, since it got hot so quickly, which I wasn't used to anymore :)  So a great investement. Now to do larger castings with it again. So my hobby is saved!

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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I got the power feed on my grizzly mill mounted. It was such a poorly designed product. The mounting screws are nearly impossible to get to. However, it's done. Onto the next poorly designed element: installing the limit switch. I have to remove a bunch of pieces then drill and tap some holes. It's not beyond my skill level, it's just a hassle. That's a tomorrow project.

 

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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I've been on kind of a chasing kick lately with the folders and made these pins. The thistle is for my partner since her grandfather was Scottish and the maple leaf is for me because she's Canadian. 

 

IMG_20240607_201239_575_copy_768x768.jpg

 

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Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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Posted (edited)
On 5/26/2024 at 3:32 PM, Alan Longmire said:

four day class with Mark Aspery...

And he said he was retiring last year......

That's a great class.

Edited by Joshua States

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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I finished this Commission today and got to hand it over to the customer.  Always feels good to get something finished

Truck Knife.jpg Truck Knife4.jpg

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