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What did you do in your shop today?


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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

No, but I bet they're gonna be awesome!  I'd love to get into that, but there you go.  Too many hobbies, not enough time/space.

My blacksmith mentor told me that retirement is when you finally have the time to do all the things you never had time to do before.

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A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves han

Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...    

Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

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In my shop today.....

 I discovered that I can step up onto my hip-high work bench, over the blade-vice that I am using for sanding, when a visitor and I startle each other at a distance of about 4 feet.

I can also step from bench to bench when reaching for the long handled broom.

My visitor was one of these.

Notechis scutatus, Tiger snake. (Photo taken by me of a different individual on the driveway a while ago)

Tiger1 - Copy.jpg

Edited by Anthony Peterson
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5 hours ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Oh, how I want to answer that, but will instead bite my tongue :-) 

I was going to say "they've been living with my ex wife"

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22 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Why is it almost everything in Australia can kill you in a horrible manner?  :ph34r:

Is there a nice way of doing it?

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Well, there's not doing it at all for a start, followed by quick and painless... :lol: look up tiger snake to see how much the opposite it can be.  Up to 80% fatal if untreated, and it's relatively benign compared to some other critters down there!

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I'd love to live in a warmer climate, but if dealing with those things is the tradeoff, I'll gladly keep my cold and snow!

 

My son and I spent the day building the wife's Christmas present.

 

20171217_172720.jpg

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Really beautiful chair Alex! What's the wood species?

BTW- the tiger snake is native to southern Australia. Not exactly what I'd call a warmer climate........:-)

Edited by Joshua States
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Thanks!  I always forget how close Australia is to the south pole.  Here in Michigan south means warmer, north means you're Canadian. Lol

The chair is red cedar.  Not knowing how she's going to want it finished, I didn't want to make it out of treated pine just in case she wants a more natural look.  Knowing her though, I'll end up having to paint it some weird color that will actually turn out looking really good in the end.  I about cried when she painted the knotty pine on the walls in the living room of our new house.  And don't ask about all of the solid oak trim, I don't think I can bear to talk about it.  :angry::D

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24 minutes ago, Alex Middleton said:

when she painted the knotty pine on the walls in the living room of our new house.  And don't ask about all of the solid oak trim,

Sacrilege !!!!! My chest hurts reading that.......

Here's what I did in my shop today. I came home from two days of deer hunting (unsuccessful) and Liz says to me "the front door won't open". A quick check and the door handle & lock mechanism was somehow non-operational. This is the door.

Door.JPG

 

This has a Baldwin lockset. These are very finicky pieces of hardware. So today, I ventured to stop being a blade smith, and temporarily become a locksmith. Here is the innards of the lockset mechanism.

lock resized 1.jpg

There are 6 different springs in this thing. The long squiggly one in the lower right corner is the one I made to replace the original that had gone kaput. It was made of copper. Who makes a spring out of copper?

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12 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

 Who makes a spring out of copper?

Uhm, I heard a company called "Baldwin" does.

 

(Lord forgive me and be with the starving pygmies in New Guinea)

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Had a very successful casting yesterday!  That's a big, solid bronze blade. It's a very close reproduction of one of the bronze age ceremonial giant dirks. Over twice the size of the normal functional versions, and weighing nearly 3kg. The blade is 70cm long, 18cm wide, and for the most part 9mm thick. The first casting I did last week was missing a small corner of the hilt plate (never intended to receive a hilt though), but this one is perfect. It's not too difficult too cast, but the size of it makes everything much more physicial. The mould itself weighs about 30-40kg for instance. And filling the crucible up to 4kg takes 4 charges, with a total melting time including heating up the furnace of nearly 2 hours.

ommerschans4.jpg

ommerschans1.jpg

ommerschans3.jpg

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Holy moly Jeroen, that is way cool. I saw a glimpse of this project on FB and was wondering something about bronze. I am assuming this is silicon bronze. Does it come out of the casting fairly soft? Do you have to work harden it? I'm curious about annealing or hardening bronze and I cannot think of anyone better than you to ask.

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35 minutes ago, Kreg said:

Got round 2 handle on my bowie. What kind of oil or finish would you guys recommend? Up until now have only used micarda and antler.

 

coco.jpg

Linseed oil and wax. Do a Google search of the Forum. There was a discussion of the method in the last few weeks.

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8 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Linseed oil and wax. Do a Google search of the Forum. There was a discussion of the method in the last few weeks.

I use Tru-Oil followed by wax, so pretty much the same thing besides a different oil.

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I like Danish oil and nothing.......except a little buff with a cotton cloth.

Get that sanded down to at least 400 grit or the oils will make those scratches pop like fireworks.

Edited by Joshua States
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17 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Holy moly Jeroen, that is way cool. I saw a glimpse of this project on FB and was wondering something about bronze. I am assuming this is silicon bronze. Does it come out of the casting fairly soft? Do you have to work harden it? I'm curious about annealing or hardening bronze and I cannot think of anyone better than you to ask.

It's tin bronze, with 13.5% tin just as the original. If it were to have a functional edge, it would have to be work hardened. But this one doesn't need to be sharp.

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14 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

I use Tru-Oil followed by wax, so pretty much the same thing besides a different oil.

On face book had people recommend danish oil, tung(sp?) oil,boiled linseed oil, and something called in speed oil...or something like that.

Tru-oil is a new one for me. I guess I will go to ace across from my house and flip a coin:P

As far as the wax goes....I am lost there. Like parrafin...or automotive wax??

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Linspeed and Tru oil are gunstock finishes that work well for knives. They are basically boiled linseed oil with quick drying agents added and some to give a shine. Raw linseed never dries so they put it through a process they call "boiling" so it will dry. Tung oil is great but all in all the final result, if tbe wood is prepped right, is about the same. I like linseed because it is the cheapest to buy and use. A little is all it takes. I can also cut it 1/1 with mineral spirits (paint thinner) and let it soak in for better penetration and faster drying for a couple of base coats. Depending on the wood if I have taken it to 500 grit or finer I may wet sand with the last grit on the first full coat, using just a couple of drops of oil and then let it dry a few days. Linseed oil will also keep a long time. The only two downsides are time and the fact that you HAVE to dispose of the wipe rags safely because they can spontaneously combust if wadded up and exposed to air.

After the oil is good and dry I take furniture paste wax, sold in the same aisle as the linseed, and take a hair dryer, heat the handle, smear the wax on keeping it really soft with the dryer and let it set until fully hard. I then buff it off with a really soft chamois.

It might sound complicated but once you get in to it, it becomes intuitive because you can see the results and finish develop as you do it.

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10 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Linspeed and Tru oil are gunstock finishes that work well for knives. They are basically boiled linseed oil with quick drying agents added and some to give a shine. Raw linseed never dries so they put it through a process they call "boiling" so it will dry. Tung oil is great but all in all the final result, if tbe wood is prepped right, is about the same. I like linseed because it is the cheapest to buy and use. A little is all it takes. I can also cut it 1/1 with mineral spirits (paint thinner) and let it soak in for better penetration and faster drying for a couple of base coats. Depending on the wood if I have taken it to 500 grit or finer I may wet sand with the last grit on the first full coat, using just a couple of drops of oil and then let it dry a few days. Linseed oil will also keep a long time. The only two downsides are time and the fact that you HAVE to dispose of the wipe rags safely because they can spontaneously combust if wadded up and exposed to air.

After the oil is good and dry I take furniture paste wax, sold in the same aisle as the linseed, and take a hair dryer, heat the handle, smear the wax on keeping it really soft with the dryer and let it set until fully hard. I then buff it off with a really soft chamois.

It might sound complicated but once you get in to it, it becomes intuitive because you can see the results and finish develop as you do it.

And that is pretty much the process I use.  The Tru-Oil is good because of the speed at which it dries.  I typically sand out to 1000 grit, and then wet sand the first coat or two.  A few more coats after that, and then it gets buffed out with wax on a buffiing wheel.  I hand buff after that with a clean piece of cotton (old cotton tshirt).  Some woods don't need oil and in that case, I skip the oil the part.  The rest is the same.

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