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1 hour ago, Wes Detrick said:

I typically sand out to 1000 grit,

Wow. I have never sanded wood that fine. I typically go to about 400 max and then switch to 000 and 0000 steel wool.

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A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves han

Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...    

Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

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23 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Linspeed and Tru oil are gunstock finishes that work well for knives. They are basically boiled linseed oil with quick drying agents added and some to give a shine. Raw linseed never dries so they put it through a process they call "boiling" so it will dry. Tung oil is great but all in all the final result, if tbe wood is prepped right, is about the same. I like linseed because it is the cheapest to buy and use. A little is all it takes. I can also cut it 1/1 with mineral spirits (paint thinner) and let it soak in for better penetration and faster drying for a couple of base coats. Depending on the wood if I have taken it to 500 grit or finer I may wet sand with the last grit on the first full coat, using just a couple of drops of oil and then let it dry a few days. Linseed oil will also keep a long time. The only two downsides are time and the fact that you HAVE to dispose of the wipe rags safely because they can spontaneously combust if wadded up and exposed to air.

After the oil is good and dry I take furniture paste wax, sold in the same aisle as the linseed, and take a hair dryer, heat the handle, smear the wax on keeping it really soft with the dryer and let it set until fully hard. I then buff it off with a really soft chamois.

It might sound complicated but once you get in to it, it becomes intuitive because you can see the results and finish develop as you do it.

Great info from all you guys....thanks.  Maybe I will post a before and after pic. Edit....btw how should I properly dispose of the rags. I have I fire pit in my back yard....can burn em I guess. Kind of a bummer I cracked the handle peening the pins. One side is worse than the other. I am thinking maybe some crazy glue before the final sand and oil. Am open  for suggestions there also.

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Its pretty hair line...if I were going to try and sell it I would redo it...again. lol One the one side its from the pin to the blade...one the other it goes past the pin a bit.

I have 3 other blades that need handles. I am trying to refrain from starting a new blade until I get some handles done.

Thanks for the sanding tip....would not have thought of that.

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13 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Wow. I have never sanded wood that fine. I typically go to about 400 max and then switch to 000 and 0000 steel wool.

I'm the other way around. I hardly ever touch bare wood with steel wool. Maybe to buff some types of hard finish. Matching the sanding level to the wood and the finish is a specialty I learned doing furniture work and antique repair and restoration. That and using scrapers but that doesn't apply here 

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20 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Wow. I have never sanded wood that fine. I typically go to about 400 max and then switch to 000 and 0000 steel wool.

You would be surprised at how gorgeous it comes out.  Cocobolo, Desert Ironwood and Ebony will buff out to a nice luster after sanding them that high.  I do not like steel wool on wood.  I have had some bad experience with transfer that was impossible to fix :(

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Wes, you rubbed too hard with the steel wool. It's not intended to create more dust. It's to remove the sanding dust that clogs the grain and blocks stain and finish penetration. Cocobolo is so waxy to begin with it buffs out well anyway.

Different strokes I guess.

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18 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Wes, you rubbed too hard with the steel wool. It's not intended to create more dust. It's to remove the sanding dust that clogs the grain and blocks stain and finish penetration. Cocobolo is so waxy to begin with it buffs out well anyway.

Different strokes I guess.

Using linseed oil and wet sanding I am trying to get the sanding dust to stay and fill in the pores. The highlighting and reflection of those small particles brings out the figure of the wood.

I choose wood, for handles and knife grips and other such that are to be handled, that does not need staining to look good. Staining and hard finishes do not last as long as what nature gives us.

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Made these for a referral customer:

andirons.jpg

Picture is horrible, but you get the idea.

Tenon through the base and tenon through the front... good joinery practice.

This was the first serious iron work I've done in my gasser. It demands a completely different rhythm compared to a coal forge. Not as peaceful, but more productive.

 

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3 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Using linseed oil and wet sanding I am trying to get the sanding dust to stay and fill in the pores. The highlighting and reflection of those small particles brings out the figure of the wood.

I choose wood, for handles and knife grips and other such that are to be handled, that does not need staining to look good. Staining and hard finishes do not last as long as what nature gives us.

I think I will simply say that I disagree with everything you stated and leave it at that.

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2 hours ago, Don Abbott said:

Tenon through the base and tenon through the front... good joinery practice.

This was the first serious iron work I've done in my gasser. It demands a completely different rhythm compared to a coal forge. Not as peaceful, but more productive.

Nice Don! Is there a fireplace waiting for these to reside in?

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22 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Wes, you rubbed too hard with the steel wool. It's not intended to create more dust. It's to remove the sanding dust that clogs the grain and blocks stain and finish penetration. Cocobolo is so waxy to begin with it buffs out well anyway.

Different strokes I guess.

Honestly, I would just rather not mess with it steel wool and wood anymore.  I tend to blow out the wood with air between grits.  Also, I tend not to use anything anymore but stabilized or naturally stable woods.  Environmental movement of wood pisses me off.

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28 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

Honestly, I would just rather not mess with it steel wool and wood anymore.  I tend to blow out the wood with air between grits.  Also, I tend not to use anything anymore but stabilized or naturally stable woods.  Environmental movement of wood pisses me off.

Whatever works for you brother! There's more than two ways to make it look good, and your work certainly looks better than good.

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35 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

Honestly, I would just rather not mess with it steel wool and wood anymore.  I tend to blow out the wood with air between grits.  Also, I tend not to use anything anymore but stabilized or naturally stable woods.  Environmental movement of wood pisses me off.

I have to agree with you about the stabilized wood for certain knives and woods because og stability and it just happens to be sort of "self finishing" . It saves a lot of time on some projects.

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6 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Whatever works for you brother! There's more than two ways to make it look good, and your work certainly looks better than good.

I greatly appreciate that compliment Josh, yours is an opinion I value.

 

6 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

I have to agree with you about the stabilized wood for certain knives and woods because og stability and it just happens to be sort of "self finishing" . It saves a lot of time on some projects.

There is a lot to be said for this.  I know that some people don't like stabilized wood for the feeling of artificiality, and I can respect that, but that is something I am ok with since the trade offs are valuable to me.

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13 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

I greatly appreciate that compliment Josh, yours is an opinion I value.

 

There is a lot to be said for this.  I know that some people don't like stabilized wood for the feeling of artificiality, and I can respect that, but that is something I am ok with since the trade offs are valuable to me.

We have a very beautiful local wood, myrtlewood. The burls and figured parts are gorgeous but years of experience, both my own and others, say that it has to be stabilized. The local sporting goods store asked me if I would either make stabilized pistol grips (primarily for 1911 type pistols) or make stabilized material available for others to do so. They have a demand for grips from it but refuse to deal with the problems of myrtlewood's "wandering nature" . The owner feels the same about knife scales. No "finish" has been able to control it.

 

For me it's a win/win since the wood is way cheaper, because it's local, than importing other figured woods and stabilized wood has advantages in making knife scales or handles of any type . 

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On 12/21/2017 at 6:12 PM, Joshua States said:

Nice Don! Is there a fireplace waiting for these to reside in?

These were a North Georgia Christmas present. Should be in use by morning.

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