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What did you do in your shop today?


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@Conner Michaux 

Ferric is gonna be best. It needs to be diluted with water. 4 parts water to one part ferric. Lots of folks keep it in a big piece of PVC capped on the bottom. Use pipe dope (or whatever that PVC sealant/adhesive stuff is). You can get a cap for the top too. 

But lemon juice or white vinegar should give you a sneak peek. Doesnt have to be fresh. Just make sure your scale from the quench is cleaned off good.

Good luck!

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Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

No knife work since right after Christmas, I've been in furniture mode.  The backstory:  I won a couple of steel scuba tanks with the bottom cut off at an iron-in-the-hat at my local blacksmith's guil

Been working on a blade for the past few days. It's a 9 1/4" 9 bar serpent core dagger - silver steel edges with a serpent of alternating 15n20 and 11 layer twist set in mild steel:  

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Okay thanks!  Ive got one more question, Can I use the vinegar before heat treat, just to see what pattern it is? Or will it etch to deep to be sanded off? Sorry for the never ending stream of questions! 

Edited by Conner Michaux
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3 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

Okay thanks!  Ive got one more question, Can I use the vinegar before heat treat, just to see what pattern it is? Or will it etch to deep to be sanded off? Sorry for the never ending stream of questions! 

You can, but it won't turn out as bold as hardened steel. And don't worry about asking too many questions. It's cheaper to ask questions. 

Etching actually causes a change in topography on the surface of a blade. The acid or salt will corrode the steel with the most carbon, or the lowest resistant alloys more aggressively than the other. So when you knock the oxides off, one is left lower than the other. The deeper the etch; the more contrast you'll get. 

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Okay! Test etch is done I’m going to sand off the etch, and get ready for heat treat, I didn’t get around to it yesterday. Do you guys have any idea what pattern that is?

image.jpg

Edited by Conner Michaux
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3 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

Do you guys have any idea what pattern that is?

Looking Good Conner.    That pattern looks like it started as a small scale crushed W's maybe ?   Maybe with a slight twist in it as well.

Best I can tell anyway's, could be wrong...

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600 grit on the bevels 400 on flats, that’s probably over kill for a blade that hasn’t been heat treated yet. But hey! It’s practice. 

image.jpg

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IMG_20190413_144448.jpg

We made some hearth steel a couple of weekends ago. Ran into some issues at first but Emiliano came to the rescue with sage advice. Here is a knife from the material after heat treatment. 

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Once I sanded it to 600 I re etched for 10 minutes or so, and it got a much darker etch.

image.jpg

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13 hours ago, nprovos said:

IMG_20190413_144448.jpg

We made some hearth steel a couple of weekends ago. Ran into some issues at first but Emiliano came to the rescue with sage advice. Here is a knife from the material after heat treatment. 

Looks great!  

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That looks to be a repurposed jack hammer bit, good score !!...............B)

Bet hammerin it out was a chore though.............;)

Edited by Clifford Brewer
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22 hours ago, nprovos said:

We made some hearth steel a couple of weekends ago. Ran into some issues at first but Emiliano came to the rescue with sage advice. Here is a knife from the material after heat treatment. 

Man that looks cool.

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2 hours ago, Clifford Brewer said:

That looks to be a repurposed jack hammer bit, good score !!...............B)

Bet hammerin it out was a chore though.............;)

You are correct, on both counts, but the 25# LG does wonders.

I have several used JH bits. They actually sell them at the tool rental in Home Depot, but these were donated by a contractor friend.

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5 hours ago, jake cleland said:

this is what I was working on when I got bit...

I always say that the price goes up if it drew blood during the making. That means it has a spirit and knows what its purpose in life really is.

BTW-That's a smoking Dirk blade

Edited by Joshua States
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That little axe drift was lonely. So, I made him some friends. Other than a little wire wheel cleanup, these are all as-forged.

Tooling.jpg

Round Mandrel.jpg

Round bick.jpg

Flat bick.jpg

 

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15 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

What, no spear socket mandrel? :lol:

The axeman cometh.:ph34r:

Besides, I ran out of jackhammer bits......

Edited by Joshua States
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I have a new least favourite activity: pop riveting :ph34r:

At least I've started with the aluminium cladding on my DIY canopy, DIY rubberizing of the load bed this weekend and maybe....hopefully mounting the canopy.

More importantly, maximum 10 days before I can resume knife making.....even looking forward to hand sanding! :D

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I demolished 2 walls in a barn(build in the 1940--50's), and removed some iron railing to make room for a new shop at the farm :) ,hopefully I can sell some forged nails, charcoal and firewood there - during the removal I found what I believe to be Wrought iron in the concrete, but spark testing will hopefully reveal what it is. But that's a project for tomorrow, now I need some rest - smashing concrete with a sledge hammer is hard work..

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