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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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On 4/14/2019 at 5:45 PM, Joshua States said:

You are correct, on both counts, but the 25# LG does wonders.

I have several used JH bits. They actually sell them at the tool rental in Home Depot, but these were donated by a contractor friend.

I spent hours and hours making a hammer drift - only to go to a friends forge where he had a bucket full of hammer eye drifts of all sorts, they all seemed to have been made from old cold chisels . . . Wish I thought of that.   

Jack hammer bits, from what I was told - are a good chance of being an air hardening steel. If that's true of not, I have not experimented to know.

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2 hours ago, Daniel W said:

Jack hammer bits, from what I was told - are a good chance of being an air hardening steel. If that's true of not, I have not experimented to know.

Every one of those big hexagonal bits I have used was 1045.  Someone, back in the 1980s, put it out there that all jackhammer bits are S-7.  I  have never seen one of those.  The late Grant Sarver of Off-Center Forge started a business repointing bits in the early 1990s, and he called the companies to find out what the heat treat should be.  They all gave him identical "heat to medium red, oil quench, temper at 350 degrees F, but only one (Brunner & Lay) told him what the steel was: 1045 with a pinch of silicon added.

It may well be the little ones Bosch makes could be an S-series,  and there's no telling about the big hydraulic rock-breakers on track hoe arms, but the standard pavement breaker bit is 1045.

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Ahhh, good to know.  Reasons why I always try to cover my butt and say, I don not know if it is a certainty as my experience with whats out there is limited. 

From those I've been learning from, we all seem to be scrap steel junkies for making tooling.

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This might be a better place to ask but would it be easier to use the tang at a full heat and burn out the grooves for the tang instead of chipping them out with a dremel does that work well at all or would that just epically go wrong for me?

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6 hours ago, AndrewB said:

This might be a better place to ask but would it be easier to use the tang at a full heat and burn out the grooves for the tang instead of chipping them out with a dremel does that work well at all or would that just epically go wrong for me?

I haven't a clue what you are talking about. Are you talking about fitting the tang into a wood block? If you are, do a Google site search for "burning in a tang" there are lots of examples of how to do this.

 

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12 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

I haven't a clue what you are talking about. Are you talking about fitting the tang into a wood block? If you are, do a Google site search for "burning in a tang" there are lots of examples of how to do this.

 

No was talking about into scales not the block itself I was watching a video on bolsters earlier today eventually I’ll give that a try out. What was aiming for was to have a better fit for the tang in the scale halves rather than carving the space out

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Use sharp chisels. Also, a jigsaw blade can be helpful in creating outline grooves if the wood is liable to crack. Just hold it in your hand or glue it to a handle then carefully use the teeth to make channels and then carve out the rest slowly. And check a lot to make sure too much isnt remover!

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11 minutes ago, Mike Ward said:

Use sharp chisels. Also, a jigsaw blade can be helpful in creating outline grooves if the wood is liable to crack. Just hold it in your hand or glue it to a handle then carefully use the teeth to make channels and then carve out the rest slowly. And check a lot to make sure too much isnt remover!

I’ve tried the chisels before and last time I used a chisel I broke the scale lol

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Posted (edited)

Butt the scale up to the guard and clamp the scale and tang together. Draw a pencil line around the tang. Do the other side. Take a utility knife or an Exacto knife and cut the inside of the pencil line about 1/16" deep Do this is several passes. Go slowly and a little deeper each pass. take either a very sharp small flat chisel or the same utility knife and holding it at an angle, cut away a small groove around the outline. This gives you a clean and crisp edge around the outside of the tang. Now remove the rest with the Dremel. I use a bit like this and this.

You can also use the first one to cut the line instead of the knife.

Edited by Joshua States

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Ok I’ll have to give that a go I do have a round DreMel bit

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Making the most out of my vacation time...

Made some tongs out of square bar; to hold squarebar; to make more tongs for roundbar; to make a hammer; to forge more stuff. Pre-meditation at it's best. I need to make some bloomery tongs too. 

Worked on my old katana some too. Using the finest fullering tool known to man; the 3x21" black&decker belt sander. :rolleyes:

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I have neither the desire, nor the patience, for tong making.

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Yeah, I'm not very good at it, but at least I'm learning. Those curled ends have got to go. They also can't be hung on a rack; the way the reigns are set up. They work is all I can say :lol:

I'm giving serious thought to assembling tongs from like 7/16" round bar, with a flat bar boss, and sections of tubing, angle iron, or flat bar welded on the ends for the jaw. It's less romantic, but faster and easier on time and gas. Geoff posted a video of these "constructed tongs" somewhere a while back. 

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I forged stainless for the first time. 

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Hey All,

Been busy lately.  Here is a set just out of its second Temper Cycle.   Heat Treated last night.

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Mostly recycled materials.   The Mutt Damascus started as 3 types of old band saw blades,  then added Leaf Spring, A FIle, Drill Rod.   Then added a few layers of 1084, 15n20 and 52100.  It's a Mutt.   Now for the fun of cleaning, handling and sheathing the lot...

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10 hours ago, Bruno said:

It's a Mutt. 

I love it. Mutts are the best.

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On 4/10/2019 at 2:55 PM, Conner Michaux said:

That’s pretty small! :P  If I can’t find Birch, Juniper, or curly Chestnut, I might have to get some of that..

Conner I have about 2 dozen different blocks of wood ranging from A-Z.....Black Walnut, White Oak, Red Oak, Hickory, Maple, Tigerwood, Zebra Wood, bolivian rose wood what type of wood grain pattern are you looking for???

 

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Doing some good old fashioned hand sanding on this little guy my 12-yr old has claimed for herself... we’ll see :lol:

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Lesson of the day: Don’t bring acetone anywhere near a fire. I usually pour a little bit of acetone on the dirty microfiber clothes from my shed, but a little piece burning cloth decided he wanted to fly into the acetone.... the natural human instinct is the flail the burning object around. NOT A GOOD IDEA.. flaming acetone flying everywhere is terrifying, so me deciding I didn’t want to die, so I slapped the mothers love out of the Can, Fire was killed.. but my finger was on fire, luckily I wasn’t burned almost at all, just a red finger. I stamped out all the burning grass. And everything is good now.    I swear I’m usually not this stupid. :rolleyes:     Mistakes happen, lesson learned.

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I was making a small billet of Damascus a few weeks ago and I cleaned all the pieces with acetone. I put the cap back on the acetone put it back on the shelf and started welding the billet up. I flipped my welding helmet up and there was a rag engulfed in flames and i instinctively grabbed the rag (with bare hands) and went looking for my slack bucket which was outside next to my coal foge and the garage door was shut. That's when I just kinda flung it in the general direction of my anvil. I figured that has to be an ok spot for it because all the hot steel I drop had to have already burned up anything flammable. Well lesson learned. 3 burned fingers and I could have just left the rag there to burn and it wouldn't have hurt anything on the steel bench.:wacko:

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Not half bad for not picking up a hammer in 5 months, me thinks. 5.5” hunter/Bowie 

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My kids wanted me to do a "forged in fir challenge" this is the result. 

Starting stock was kept with the salvage theme. Old trailer leaf spring. I treated it like it was 5160 

Blade length: 9 3/4"

Overall length: 14 7/8" 

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I was able to get almost all the grnd lines out and up to 600 grit but if you look close there is a few still in there.

Guard and pummel are mild steel and was drilled undersize and hot punched with an exact replica tang punch thingy.Resized_20190504_193741.jpeg 

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Mine have asked if I would do the same thing... might have to give it a go

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