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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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Bought a new angle grinder, now the only thing to do before cutting open the tank  - picking up 10 kg or roughly 22 pounds of dry ice for displacing the atmospheric air to avoid any unplanned explosions :)

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Or you could just fill it with water......

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15 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Before you pick a path, it is best to know what type of buyer is available to you and where you have to go to put your work in front of them.

I cannot help but think that your circumstances would lend themselves to a mixture of the two. Develop a couple of models that you can reproduce quickly and efficiently (even if they are done stock removal for the most part). Small utility EDC type blades, hunter/skinner, etc. You could probably buy a couple of rolls of paracord for the handle and not have much invested in materials or time. Knock them out and sell them to buyers or see if a local outfitter will buy a few and put them on the shelf. Then you take one or two custom projects in a year that you want to make. These are your "progress" knives. These are the ones that you take chances on, push your skills to the next level, and sell at the higher price point to anyone who can afford it.

That's a new bug up my a***, I know my marketing sucks a bit and I'm for sure not the most approachable person, but I got told recently "Ivan gets lost of orders and he's also not very nice" :lol::D

Fact is there are 2 guys in the same suburb as me doing a lot better as far as sales are concerned simply because of their network. The one guy recently retired and his first order for something like 26 knives paid for his coarse and capital outlay in equipment.....

I hesitate to call myself an artist, but I guess I am more an artist than a businessman, and although I have and will make similar knives, I want each one to be custom.

I.E. I'm a looser :lol:

Had a dream last night of some woman shouting at me "you can't stop working at 44!"

:lol:

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Steve - I could, but 10 kg of dry ice is easier than hauling 1800 litres of water up a steep hill  ;) 

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14 hours ago, SteveShimanek said:

Or you could just fill it with water......

A local old timer here filled a gas tank with water thinking it was the safest way to weld it. Well he isnt with us anymore. What happened was a layer of gasoline formed around all the water and when it ignited the water created a "pressure" tank and it exploded. I just thought I would throw that out there. I might actually put this in the "things you dont know that can kill you" thread.

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19 hours ago, Troels Saabye said:

Bought a new angle grinder, now the only thing to do before cutting open the tank  - picking up 10 kg or roughly 22 pounds of dry ice for displacing the atmospheric air to avoid any unplanned explosions :)

 

4 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

A local old timer here filled a gas tank with water thinking it was the safest way to weld it. Well he isnt with us anymore. What happened was a layer of gasoline formed around all the water and when it ignited the water created a "pressure" tank and it exploded. I just thought I would throw that out there. I might actually put this in the "things you dont know that can kill you" thread.

This has been discussed before. Initial cutting of the tank should be done with a tool that does not produce high sparking, like a saw. I know it's a lot more work, but at least you will remain in one piece, and not rest in pieces.

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I talked it over with a friend of mine who dealt with marine engineering, including old oil tanks - told me an angle grinder and CO2 was the safest way to go :)  Hopefully it works with me living to tell the tale ;)

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On 7/1/2019 at 6:08 PM, Joshua States said:

Oh. BTW- Those three knives in the middle look a  lot like Lin Rhea's X-Rhea knives. These sell really well for him (then again, he IS Lin RHea!)

Very much so!

I know the name and I know I've seen his work, but my more recent inspiration is a South African smith also making something very similar.

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9 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

Very much so!

I know the name and I know I've seen his work, but my more recent inspiration is a South African smith also making something very similar.

Stuart Anthony Smith?

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14 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Stuart Anthony Smith?

No, but he probably has and could do it in his sleep. :D

For the life of me I can never remember his name when I want to show somebody, problem is he has one of the very common Afrikaans surnames so I forget. 

What I now know is his knives are very similar to Lin Rhea's, specifically how the hang is connected.

Mr Smith is somebody I need to emulate, he hasn't been at it that long and he's come very far.  Himself and Neels van den Berg share a lot of information and techniques on the various platforms. 

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Back from a little vacation with the family in Chicago. Went to the Chicago museum of science and industry. Wow what a place. The Tesla coil was my favorite then the U-505 submarine was awesome too but to see that many volts go off and light up a light bulb via wireless transmission was crazy. 

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I just finished up this little hatchet this morning. Mild steel with a spring steel bit. Folded to form the eye. 12 inch hickory handle. Weighs in at about 1lb. Tuned out nice but there is a few things I'm going to do differently on the next one. Resized_20190701_152419(1).jpeg

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Here is a few pictures of the U-505

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Not exactly in the shop, but I managed to sneak away from camp by myself this morning for a couple of hours on the river.

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Now we're just sitting around waiting for the brisket to be done.

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It's gonna be a good day! :D

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Nice fish! I am working on a shirasaya for a wakizashi I am polishing....and hunting for the rat that nearly jumped me on my workbench yesterday. He keeps stealing my microfiber towels trying to make a nest.

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Installed a DIY ductless mini split air conditioner in the shop.   The lines come pre charged so no special tools or equipment are needed.  Well, I did have to buy a 3.5" hole saw but otherwise just basic tools.   HVAC installers wanted around $6000 for an installed mini split system but this one was $1300 from Costco.   

It's a 24x30 metal building with an 11' ceiling and the roll insulation.  It's not frigid in the shop but I'd call it comfortable, which is a revelation compared to what it was in Texas summers.  

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3 hours ago, HSJackson said:

DIY ductless mini split air conditioner

What BTU. I just installed the biggest window air conditioner I could get for my house and it is 24,000 BTU. I had to put it on it's own 20 amp breaker to run 220 to it. I'm considering putting one in my shop.

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Getting there... Spent all my motor money on a guitar. Hobbies are like stray dogs... You take one in, love it very much, then spend all yur money on it. 

It's in running order now, just adding weight to the base and might make a slightly heavier ram, and add a little more counter weight. But gonna wait a few paychecks to buy a motor. Then I gotta fab up a steel drive wheel for it.  

 

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3 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

What BTU. I just installed the biggest window air conditioner I could get for my house and it is 24,000 BTU. I had to put it on it's own 20 amp breaker to run 220 to it. I'm considering putting one in my shop.

It's 18,000 BTU, supposed to be good for up to 800 sq ft but it doesn't get my 720 sq ft shop below 78 in the afternoon sun.   Still beats the heck out of 100 degrees and I have the air flow directed at my assembly bench where I spend the most time.  Actually pretty nice with it blowing right on me, but bigger would be nicer.   They make a couple bigger sizes.   Mr. Cool brand, lots of videos online. 

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Spent the last few days in the shop trying to finish this one up. Longer hunter style with a wrought iron guard and curly maple handle.

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This is right out of the ferric chloride, apparently I had put some copper in at some point and it coated the wrought a little. Just thought it looked cool.

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Is there anything anyone sees wrong or odd?

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1 hour ago, Mike Ward said:

Is there anything anyone sees wrong or odd?

If I really wanted to be picky (and I mean real picky) I would say the gap at the guard, the misshapen pin hole, and the handle shape could use a little love. 

Really cool effect you had with that ferric!

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49 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

gap at the guard, the misshapen pin hole, and the handle shape could use a little love.

What gap are you talking about? Between the ricasso or between the handle? I tried to peen the guard tight but wasn’t able to get one spot all the way. And the handle transition,  I rounded the joint a little. And what would you do to the handle shape? I appreciate the criticism, thank you!

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2 hours ago, Mike Ward said:

Is there anything anyone sees wrong or odd?

Wrong? Not so much. Odd? Well, yes. (forgive me if this seems harsh. It is not intended to belittle your work in any way, but you asked)

This knife looks like it was "organically produced". What I mean by that, is it looks like there was no plan beforehand and no goal other than to "make a knife". Don't get me wrong, there's nothing "wrong" with that, it just winds up looking odd to me. The blade is very curvy with that long dropped point, the arced choil, and the constantly upward travelling edge. The handle is mostly complimentary to that curvy nature, with that oval guard and that deep back-half curved finger divot. Then there's a big flat spot on the belly of the handle and this big point at the heel with a very sharp angle. Huh? Where did that come from? The guard is way too wide for that sexy blade shape and looks like a blob to me. This knife looks like it just "happened" as the maker worked. Suddenly a thought occurred to him that this would be a good feature to install and then he picked up some materials and did it. The copper (?) pin seems out of place as it doesn't match the guard. I'm pretty picky too, I know, but unmatched hardware bugs me. Especially when there's only two pieces in the whole knife. 

On the bright side, the blade finish looks clean. I also really like the matching of lines across the guard. ( the spine of the blade with the spine of the handle and the bottom of the ricasso with the bottom of the handle. Those things really stand out as good work and a detailed focus. 

18 minutes ago, Mike Ward said:

I tried to peen the guard tight but wasn’t able to get one spot all the way.

I think that's the spot Zeb is referring to, although the junction of the wrought and the wood looks a little dubious in the photos as well. A thin spacer in this location might help. If it was copper sheet, the pin would have made more sense too.

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Yeah, what Josh said. When shaping the handle, I feel like you had something like this in mind? 

See the subtle differences that make it look more finished? 

When I say this, just know I'm an amateur at best, and it looks like a good knife already. I'm just trying to help you be picky. 

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Tested my newest chainsaw - stihl 150  - way better than my 362 for trimming and felling smaller trees, a lot lighter ^^

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