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I'm actually glad I'm not coordinated enough for multi-stringed instruments, or I'd have a closet full myself. :rolleyes:  I have things I can play decently enough (saxophone, recorders (alto and soprano)), things I can kinda play okay (pennywhistle, keyboards other than piano), and things I can't play at all (chemnitzer concertina/bandoneon hybrid , cornet).  I've tried banjo and guitar, and the left hand just doesn't keep up.  The concertina would be great, except the 53 buttons are in no logical order at all.  You just have to fiddle with it until you memorize what button does what tone, and if you don't play every day you forget.  It's a cool thing, though, made in 1924.  Transitional, too.  It's not a polka box because it has an extra button and not enough pearl, and it's not really a bandoneon because it's one button shy.  But, if you play "La vie en rose" it sounds like a Parisian cafe in the 1930s.   Scares the heck out of cats for some reason.  I had a set of parlour pipes (small bagpipes for indoor use) that I was okay with, but I traded them for my first forge and tongs.  I think that was worth it. B)

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Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

No knife work since right after Christmas, I've been in furniture mode.  The backstory:  I won a couple of steel scuba tanks with the bottom cut off at an iron-in-the-hat at my local blacksmith's guil

This long weekend I managed to get one of the bunch of three folders I'm working on ready to add scales to prior to final assembly.  The other two got new blades (one of them twice when the dovetail c

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On 9/12/2019 at 7:37 AM, Zeb Camper said:

I learned my hammers plastic guides swell shut when they get too hot recently... I literally run it till she slows to a stop.

Clay Spencer talks about this 20 minutes into this video. Seems oil is the trick.

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33 minutes ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

Clay Spencer talks about this 20 minutes into this video. Seems oil is the trick.

Thanks Jeremy! I enjoyed watching that. I oiled it pretty good. Even tried it when it seized up. I squirt fresh oil in with every pass and check everything over to make sure nothing tries to kill me while I'm getting more heat. I used enough oil that day that I got a fireball/splash when the dies hit the hot steel. 

It was the hottest day of the year when I last used it. My shop gets hot enough even on the coldest days to wear a t shirt. So, that day I was completely drenched in sweat; not a dry spot on me. I took a video running it that day, I think it's on FB, but not on my phone anymore... The dies were actually steaming. The exterior of the guide made of 1/2" thick angle got uncomfortable to the touch. 

So, it may have just been the radiant temps paired with the massive billets I was forging. I worked em' at welding heat until they were 1" thick. The dies probably could've given a gnarly burn. I think I'll have better luck with it this winter. 

 

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9 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

I took a video running it that day, I think it's on FB, but not on my phone anymore.

Just watched this. I don't remember ever seeing your hammer running before. That things works really well!

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Todays heat treat and grinding session gives me a few to handsand and start the bolster and handle process. 

WzMg5D0l.jpg

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I hand sanded to 800 grit a 5.5" petty in 26c3 steel @63-64hrc. It easily took twice the paper than with 80CrV2. Nightmarish stuff...but I believe it is the price to pay for increased edge stability and abrasion resistance...

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This weekend was Michigan's Youth Deer hunt.  It reminded me that I told my buddy's 3 daughters that I would make a knife for the first one of them that shot a deer.  Since I already had the forge out for a different project I banged this out so I would have it to work on when I have the time.

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Even though the tip dropped a bit more than I wanted, its probably my cleanest and closest to shape forging yet.

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

I hand sanded to 800 grit a 5.5" petty in 26c3 steel @63-64hrc. It easily took twice the paper than with 80CrV2. Nightmarish stuff...but I believe it is the price to pay for increased edge stability and abrasion resistance...

OK so you will pay the price, but will the customer? :D :blink:

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We have a saying "farming with flies", not sure if it translates.

Decided to try something different and finished grinding two small kitchen knives forged from 52100.

"Something different" is basically a lower grit finish because of my platen issues with belts higher than 220.

It went so well that I had time enough to heat treat these two as well as my 3rd blacksmith knife, also forged from 52100, before a BBQ at a friend....

Stayed over and had a bit too much fun, got home Sunday morning and checked the blades, I basically switched off the oven after the 2nd temper cycle, got in my car and left for my friend's place.

They are lovely, everything stayed straight, HT seems to have gone great, happiness. Except, looking at these two kitchen knives I realized they are thin, good HT, bound to be great cutters, but because they're so thin, light and on the small side I will struggle to get a good price for them....

That's where the flies come in :ph34r:

Shouldn't complain, hopefully 2 of the knives I have "in stock" will be sold this afternoon.....money for the platen build.

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Thanks Zeb and Alex.  Answer to why no pin: I'm not finished yet.  I just got a little bit ahead of myself with the Lin-Speed and not following the plan.  The tang is retentive, but I will drill it with a carbide bit today.  I should have drilled for the pin when the handle was still a block.  Lesson learned...the hard way.

48660233102_0abc8d61f8.jpg 

Edited by John Myshkoff
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John, if you want to forgo the pin, and I think you can, Accraglas will hold that knife together so well you'd need to break the handle off with hammer and chisel.  JB Weld or PC-7 epoxy putty will do that too, they're just harder to apply.  With Accraglas you just mix and pour, then quickly clean up the overflow.  The other two are putties, and harder to cram down a tight-fitting hole.  I have a few short-tanged blades held in with Accraglas alone, and I can swear it works wonderfully.  Just be sure to set the mixing cup outside while the leftovers cure, it generates enough heat to set the cup on fire if you have an ounce or more in the paper cup!

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19 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

John, if you want to forgo the pin, and I think you can, Accraglas will hold that knife together so well you'd need to break the handle off with hammer and chisel.  JB Weld or PC-7 epoxy putty will do that too, they're just harder to apply.  With Accraglas you just mix and pour, then quickly clean up the overflow.  The other two are putties, and harder to cram down a tight-fitting hole.  I have a few short-tanged blades held in with Accraglas alone, and I can swear it works wonderfully.  Just be sure to set the mixing cup outside while the leftovers cure, it generates enough heat to set the cup on fire if you have an ounce or more in the paper cup!

West Systems marine epoxy is also popular for its holding power and longevity. I have made several partial tang knives with no retention pin, including my own personal hunter, and not had any failures. I always put a few notches in the tang for additional security.

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Thanks Alan and Joshua for the advice.  I drew both versions with a pin and wanted to use a pin, but I started to put the cart before the horse.  Went to the garage and proceeded to  drill the handle and fit a brass pin.  The sixth sense said forget the pin use epoxy and all will be fine.  I drilled and the edges of the hole on both sides are not clean.  There is slight break out.  Not terrible but enough for me to kick my own butt around the town a few times.  Can I make a new handle?  Yes.  Will I ?  Don't know.   I make  puukkos by epoxying them together.  I had to hammer the hickory handle off one.  Well the lesson for today is follow the tried and true game plan and don't change the sequence of steps.   Truth be told, I liked it better without the pin.

   48744473708_6391fafba9.jpg 

48744808446_e30a71b77a.jpg 

Edited by John Myshkoff
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7 hours ago, Joshua States said:

West Systems marine epoxy is also popular for its holding power and longevity. I have made several partial tang knives with no retention pin, including my own personal hunter, and not had any failures. I always put a few notches in the tang for additional security.

This is what I do with all my seaxes.

That's a great looking knife!

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Could I get some info on this old file? I don’t remember where I got it. I spark tested it and it looks like it’s usable. But I’ve never seen this company before. Here are some pictures, don’t mind the incredibly messy shop.

D65801AC-DE51-4C46-A076-9F11BCF2952A.jpeg

It says bluegrass, I assume that’s the brand and then on the sides it says Mark, Louisville and some other stuff. 8A33632D-8FDF-4FDD-B33E-182C6193290A.jpeg

Edited by Conner Michaux
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On 9/11/2019 at 1:31 PM, Gary LT said:

Charles.... thank you! I see what you mean and I like this idea, even perhaps black on black maybe? Why not? What about the silver hardware...... does it “clash”?

Gary LT

No, I don’t think it clashes. Yes, black on black should work too.

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Conner, 

That file was most likely made by Nicholson before around 1965 or so.  Belknap Hardware was a national wholesaler who had all kinds of stuff made for them by all kinds of companies, but put their own trademark on it.  For instance, A Belknap Bluegrass anvil (they exist!) is a Hay-Budden, their axes were by Collins, their forges and blowers were by Buffalo, etc.  Basically all top-quality stuff, and highly collectible in good shape.  Thus the file is most likely a Nicholson Black Diamond.  If it's in good enough shape to use, do so!  If it's totally worn out, make a few knives out of it.  It's W-2.  ;)

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Thanks Alan, the teeth are basically just little bumps now, completely worn down. This thing has been put to hard work. 

I’m finally going to attempt to forge a Yakut. We’ll see how that turns out.

Edited by Conner Michaux
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Just finished forging this little hook, I need to make a punch so I can punch holes.

F93CB1D5-D715-490F-9967-06739A55F164.jpeg

EA9CED20-F4FF-4EFA-8A60-5AB2C53A4B7C.jpeg

Edited by Conner Michaux
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Made a piece of rolled micarta from red dyed Hessian (burlap) coffee bags, added blue tint to the resin, as well as a think slab of black cotton twill micarta for bolsters.

The blue tint in the gaps of the red burlap sounded like a  great idea in my head, developed some doubts while making it and seeing the resin penetrate between the fibers......giving me....purple?

Might not be right for what I intended, but it shouldn't be ugly 

 

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