Jump to content
Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

^ looking very nice! My heat treat forge for swords is  made from a 100 pound propane cylinder lined with 2 inch isolating wool and a clay wash. The burner is a blown design going from a single manifold into 4 pipes spaced along the length. A piece of stainless truck exhaust pipe serves as a muffle. A thermocouple is mounted in the middle to see temperatures, and there is a needle valve on the propane, and a gate valve on the air supply to regulate temperature and atmosphere. I may post a photo later if i can find it.

heattreatforge.jpg

Edited by SteveShimanek
found it
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, SteveShimanek said:

My heat treat forge for swords is  made from a 100 pound propane cylinder lined with 2 inch isolating wool and a clay wash. The burner is a blown design going from a single manifold into 4 pipes spaced along the length. A piece of stainless truck exhaust pipe serves as a muffle. A thermocouple is mounted in the middle to see temperatures, and there is a needle valve on the propane, and a gate valve on the air supply to regulate temperature and atmosphere.

Now that looks nice! I would like to build something similar, only vertical to save floor area. and help with keeping the darn thing straight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joshua, this is a nice shape and fit of components. May I ask what type of wood this is?

Thank you, Gary LT

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2019 at 4:01 PM, Gary LT said:

Joshua, this is a nice shape and fit of components. May I ask what type of wood this is?

Thank you, Gary LT

That is desert ironwood.

BTW- It helps if you use the quote function when you ask a question. That way whomever you ask, gets a little notification that someone quoted them and they can find your question faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotcha on the quote marks, 

Thanks for the reply Joshua.

Gary LT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So today was day one of seven of the blacksmithing classes. Total of 9 guys, several of who have never been behind an anvil. Great class. Lots of hammering. Got my first billet set up for a commission I have. Low layer count (90) of 80 CrV2 and 15N20. Got it done before lunch ( 9:30 -12:00 - completely unexpected how fast I got it done). Had not brought my steel for my second billet so I made a tomahawk instead.  Always impressive to watch Nathan Allen (class teacher) move metal. Timed him this time. From the time he lit his fire ( we’re working in coal forges), to the time he was ready to cut and restack his billet, 23 minuets. All the while explaining what he was doing . 

Edited by Bill Schmalhofer
Misspelled word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I needed a bit more room for basic classes, and i dont have the garage built yet, so i decided on this leanto structure built onto the milkhouse where i currently work. Best part is, i had all the lumber up in the barn. Have to put the osb and rubber on the roof yet, but that sadly is not free. I had to put the end posts on big concrete pads because sinking the poles in the ground wasnt an option because of extremely rocky ground. I have 2 pieces of white sheet steel for the north end (the milkhouse is west and im looking north) to keep out the prevailing wind. Plenty of space for the forge and an anvil on each side. Probly not a straight angle anywhere but i did my best, and with another coat of paint, a roof, should be ok. Wanted it to look a little "blacksmithy", thus all the angles. For strength too. Thanks for looking!

Tom

20190919_063938_800x450.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made this.  The best use of hoof rasps, as far as I'm concerned, although this one was some Korean brand I'd never heard of and was some seriously hard steel.  Probably was a good rasp, when it was a rasp...  The case-hardened ones from India are much easier to forge.

20191006_140350.jpg20191006_140358.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is seriously cool Alan.  I'm assuming it's a candle holder?

 

I switched out the blower on my forge from a leaf blower to an old exhaust blower that I salvaged from a discarded water heater.  It wont quite get my current forge up to welding heat, but I can do general forging with it all day long.  It seems to need less gas, and now I can actually carry on a conversation with the forge running.  It's an easy swap to put the old one back on if I need to do any forge welding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, candle holder.   Did the rasp asp in coal yesterday,  the candle cups (from 1" black iron pipe) in the mini gasser today, plus final assembly. 

I bet you can tune your burner to get to welding with the vent fan.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's close.  I ran it with the air wide open and just didnt have enough.  It's a pretty small blower.  My forge is due to be relined anyway so I may just build a new one.  I think if I downsize from 350 cubic inches to closer to 200, and maybe shrink my burner tube a bit to speed up the airflow, it'll probably get there.  It was really, really nice to not have to listen to that leaf blower whining away all afternoon.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today (and yesterday) was file work on the frame for that handle.

 

Frame filework.jpg

File worked frame (1).jpg

File worked frame (2).jpg

File worked frame (3).jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife would murder for that candle holder @alan. Pleplease hide it. I'm to young to die.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Joshua States That's some mighty dainty filework.  There isn't much room for error when the part is that thin, but it doesn't look like you needed any :)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Day three of seven of my classes ( missed posting yesterday). Finished day two with two billets of Damascus ( the previous mentioned 90 layer and a second 280 layer), and two billets of cable Damascus.

On to axe making...

Discovered today I have no problem making tomahawks. “Fort Meigs” style axes, on the other hand, have me stumped for some reason. Basically the same process ( if you boil it down to “wrap a piece of metal over on itself. Weld part of it together. Weld a bit in. Clean it up” - no offense meant Alan :unsure:). I get the pole welded. Get part of the blade welded. Then burn to whole bloody edge off when trying to weld the bit in. :angry:. Words of advice? And now dealing with some blacksmithing elbow. Also know as tennis elbow. Thank god for support braces. Little spot burn marks on the arms is up to 48.:D

 

Absolutely wasted tired but absolutely LOVING IT!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First time since my daughter is born I got to cast something again :) I have the house for myself due to construction work being done, so I'm taking the opportunity to do some metalwork. I had a 10kg tin ingot that had to be turned into more manageable size pieces, so they can be cut to size for future casting projects. So the large ingot went into the kitchen oven in an old pan at 250C, and 2 hours later cast into ingots. 

72085431_2476357332443590_73382737477632000_n.jpg

71597809_2476357322443591_3965211110151290880_n.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jeroen Zuiderwijk said:

I had a 10kg tin ingot

Wow, where did you manage to get that?!  I've only ever been able to get up to 1 pound ingots.  I tried getting some tin from a local glass manufacturer once.  They said they couldn't sell me any because it counted as a precious metal (due to the cost per pound at the time), and record keeping on such things for government purposes was such that it wouldn't be worth their time or my money to buy from them.  Had to go with a an online seller.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Wow, where did you manage to get that?!  I've only ever been able to get up to 1 pound ingots.  I tried getting some tin from a local glass manufacturer once.  They said they couldn't sell me any because it counted as a precious metal (due to the cost per pound at the time), and record keeping on such things for government purposes was such that it wouldn't be worth their time or my money to buy from them.  Had to go with a an online seller.  

 

From: https://www.carnmetals.co.uk/

I got one of their big 26kg ingots years ago. The first 16kg is gone, partly sold and partly used up by myself (no idea on what, it went much faster then I expected :) ).  This last chunk still had to be processed into smaller bits. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

And yesterday behind the furnace for the first time since my daughter was born. Another of the big bronze Ommerschans dirks (one more, then I'm done casting these):

 

 

IMG_20191008_192950.jpg

IMG_20191009_065650.jpg

Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started cleaning up the main body of the guard for a sidesword that I am really hoping to have done by Christmas. Still not sure if I'm going to make it in time. 

 

There are 5 pieces in total which I will TIG weld together. All forged from mild steel. 

 

May the lords of the forge help me to make all this hand standing swift and thorough. 

 

20191009_185904.jpg

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I got the D guard cleaned up, beveled, and welded onto the guard for the sidesword.

 

Hopefully I can blend the weld in nicely and it wont be a total PITA.

 

20191010_183945.jpg

 

20191010_183952.jpg

 

20191010_191946.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hand sanding.......so I can HT this afternoon.

 

Had a rather nasty incident, I left the tang long on the sub-hilt fight I'n busy with, curled it around so I have something to hang it from in my kiln.

I was busy thinning down the tang so it matches the step behind the ricasso, doing some finishing touches I was using the slack belt at the bottom of the grinder and I think the belt caught the pig tail, flung it into the wall behind the grinder :ph34r:

Nice chunk of cement out of the wall, tip rounded over so I had to regrind that.....but no blood at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This should have been obvious, but don't put a damp crucible into the furnace. I'd left it outside after a casting to cool down, when rain had passed over. It looked dry, so I thought it must not have been in the rain directly. Aparantly it was, it just soaked it up well. Anyway, that cost me a these days precious and rare casting opportunity, and 65 euro for a new crucible. I'd have had another sword if I'd been more careful.

 

 

IMG_20191010_180114.jpg

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...