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What did you do in your shop today?

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27 minutes ago, Mike Ward said:

Just pouring cast iron in lab. That’s all.

Pretty fun, huh?

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Sneaked a bit of finishing time this afternoon, after work, before home time ! - Im pushing to get some orders done before Christmas, and Ideally would like to get a few more forged before the holidays!

 

This is a stainless clad Nakiri i'm working on, I put this photo on instagram this evening as a 'work in progress' and sold it in about 3 mins! :) happy days!

 

RkAPZiy.jpg

 

9n8PUeJ.jpg

 

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@Jerrod Miller it’s freaking awesome!! We usually pour aluminum but my Metals Castings class tries to do at least one iron pour A semester. 

For my senior design project, my group has to make white iron spectrometer standards to use in foundry’s to calibrate their spectrometers. Last group focused on the heat transfer side of making white iron and my group is going to focus on different element additions to either prevent graphite nucleation or promote carbide formation. This was our second pour today just testing the new apparatus we redesigned and without controlling the chemistry to much.

 

This is a sample from Tuesday’s pour with about 1/8” of white iron achieved.

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The molds sit on top of copper rods to quickly conduct heat away and that all sits on a water tank. 

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Cool! 

 

As fer me: I've been in guitar land for a while. But, I got paid to draw with some soapstone for a good portion of the day. This design might be in a handrail soon. 

20191205_161229.jpg

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2 hours ago, Mike Ward said:

For my senior design project, my group has to make white iron spectrometer standards to use in foundry’s to calibrate their spectrometers.

In April the American Foundry Society's 5D (Specialty Irons) Committee is going to start working on making a set of standards like this to send out to the member foundries.  It is nearly impossible to find certified standards in appropriate chemistry ranges.  My point being, you have a great project, that is very relevant to industry needs.  If you feel interested in making a Ni-Hard Type 4, samples I know a foundry or 2 that would like to get their hands on one that is relatively well certified.  Chill casting is pretty much a requirement for alloy segregation to be minimized, so if you can ever find any standards they are usually 5 mm thick.  Ever tried to grind a 1.25" diameter disc that is only 5mm thick?  You'll lose your fingertips.  And they still want to charge a couple hundred dollars for it!  I just bought one today that is a whopping 0.75" thick, and it was $625.  

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34 minutes ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Chill casting is pretty much a requirement for alloy segregation to be minimized, so if you can ever find any standards they are usually 5 mm thick. 

 
Yup that’s what we learned. Our goal is to make standards 10mm thick and the last group actually achieved that with gray iron. But without any inoculation I believe. The previous groups explored the mechanical heat transfer side of making white iron. We took their devices concept and redesigned for ease of use and safety mitigation while keeping the heat transfer properties. My group is exploring the metallurgical side of making white iron by adding small elements to help the carbide formation without disrupting the overall chemistry. Next semester is going to be a lot of data collection.
 

 

1 hour ago, Jerrod Miller said:

It is nearly impossible to find certified standards in appropriate chemistry ranges


That’s exactly the purpose of the project. To be able to take our device to a foundry and make samples from their exact proprietary chemistry to calibrate their spectrometers.

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All you guys are doing cool stuff!  I'm stuck behind a desk...:(

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14 hours ago, Mike Ward said:

That’s exactly the purpose of the project. To be able to take our device to a foundry and make samples from their exact proprietary chemistry to calibrate their spectrometers.

 

But if you were going to come to my foundry to make samples from our proprietary alloys, I can't guarantee that the samples I made are right, because I don't have a check sample to begin with!  ;)  Seriously though, a good addition to that would be sending samples out to multiple resources to verify chemistry.  I run a spectrometer round robin for the AFS 5D Committee, and I can assure you that no two foundries read the samples the same, and some are very different.  Ensuring that you know what exactly is in your test sample for calibration/type standardization is the hardest part.  Sounds like you guys should be thinking about presenting at the Casting Congress in April.  

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Still getting paid to draw! That's one of the best parts of this job. I'm really pushing for that tree design. 

20191206_130741.jpg

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1 minute ago, Zeb Camper said:

I'm really pushing for that tree design

As you should, it is pretty cool!

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I envy people who can draw.  I can't draw worth chit! (as my little brother would say!)  I can carve anything someone else draws.  It's a bummer, I know.  That's why I admire people who can draw.  I'm waitin' for you to incorporate that tree design in a railing or gate..........or something metal.  It's beautiful. 

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1 hour ago, Jerrod Miller said:

But if you were going to come to my foundry to make samples from our proprietary alloys, I can't guarantee that the samples I made are right, because I don't have a check sample to begin with!  ;)  Seriously though, a good addition to that would be sending samples out to multiple resources to verify chemistry.


Ah yes, but if you get the melt right once and check with other samples, you have a better set that can last a very long time. But sending them out is really good idea, thank you.

 

If I can, I’ll post the results at the end of the semester.

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2 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Sounds like you guys should be thinking about presenting at the Casting Congress in April


I’m actually going to that for a different project. Casting a steel Bowie for the competition and maybe if we get enough data we can bring the white iron stuff too. 

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The Cast In Steel project is great.  They asked me to help judge the axes last year, but I was scheduled for other meetings at the same time.  I'll definitely see you there then!  I'll also be on a cast irons panel regarding mold media (silica replacements).  

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I never thought about it, but I guess there are cast steel hammers, axes and the likes. Pretty cool stuff! 

 

Boss man is against me on this one. Im sure the customer might love it. My original thought was to run some 2x1/2" under the power hammer to taper it out and then take it to the anvil to get those undulations (bends) in the trunk portion. After that, make the main branches indentical (left and right) via some of the same process. Interlock the main bits and then start fabricating and interlocking the main parts... 

He wasn't impressed, so I was like "laser cut the major parts in 3 main pieces and I'll make the rest". Still not budging. Now I'm pitching a simpler design. Usual story :rolleyes:

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Sweet drawing @Zeb Camper. Wish I could draw like that. 

 

The dichotomy between artistic flair and practical, efficient manufacturing is a cruel one. Obviously your boss doesnt see the art in your earlier designs. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Will Wilcox said:

Obviously your boss doesn't see the art in your earlier designs

 

More likely, as you hinted at, he's focusing on the negative impact that hand forged elements cause to his bottom line....

Edited by billyO
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Thanks, Will! Yeah, he's all business. It's a good balance I guess. Art and business sense I think rarely coexist (at least within one brain). So, I push to spend the extra time, and he makes sure we're still making money. 

 

I gotta get in my shop tomarrow and make Christmas gifts. I always hate just buying stuff. think I got everyone figured out. Scissors for mom (always looking for scissors), a blacksmiths knife or two, a damascus screwdriver for my electrician buddy (he wont use it, but he think it was cool), and I might try and figure out how to make a quick pan flute for my little sister (who is struggling to learn the spoons). Maybe I could figure out some cheap down & dirty copper/steel jewelry for my oldest sister... My nephew's gift I haven't figured out yet 

 

Happy holidays ya'll! 

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Rewired 3 MOTs into a homemade arc welder. Exhausting

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I needed something to keep Cooper and Alice occupied, 10 mins with a chainsaw and a stump of beechwood later :D great for hiding pellets and veggies in. Cooper in the image.

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I have to smile (pun intented) about the art/business that has popped up here.    My "Art" isn't what paid the $50,000 I've spent on my teeth this last 24 months.  Being practical about my "Business" is what put the money in my pocket.

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24 minutes ago, Gerald Boggs said:

My "Art" isn't what paid the $50,000 I've spent on my teeth this last 24 months.  Being practical about my "Business" is what put the money in my pocket.

 

That's what we were getting at. Rarely do art and business cross paths often enough for it to be a practical route to take. Some people are lucky, and are able to pursue their passion and make it work. But that is certainly not the case for the majority of us. 

 

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Luck is what you make of it.  My point:  Most of the time, those that pursue their passion, are pursuing something that no one wants to buy at a price that will put food on the table.  I keep my passion as a hobby.

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got a bit done on a couple of interesting ones today! I have zero recollection of forging the deba! - it was quite a surprise to find it was funky patternweld. I think its blue paper steel core, 15n20 cheeks, and wrought iron cladding!

 

The biggy is a 250 x 50 gyuto, with wrought iron damascus cheeks, pure Ni barrier. Its shaping up to be a good one. I was commissioned to make it at the start of the year. It looks nice with all the etch scuz cleaned off it. Ill get some proper photos of this one when its done!

 

pjIhBxu.jpg

 

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