Jump to content

WIP: XVIIIa longsword


Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

so, the last sword has just been handed over to the owner and it's time to get started on the next one (I'm on my break from school :) ) The blade on this one is inspired by the sword of Albrecht II. Oakeshott describes it as a perfect example of the type XVIIIa. My version will be a bit longer and more slender in the upper half.

Here's a pic of the full size drawing. Every sword I make starts out like this. You can also see the guard and roughed out pommel in these pics. I made the guard a while back and roughed out the pommel while waiting for the steel delivery. The pommel is still a good deal oversized, it will be ground to shape once the blade is finished and the final pommel weight determined. For the guard, weight is not really a big concern, "as light as possible" (while retaining necessary strength) is the rule of thumb I use.

P1011567.jpg

Here's the profiled blade blank next to the paper template:

P1011573.jpg

And with the fuller(s) ground in (thanks Dave!! ;) ):

P1011578.jpg

P1011577.jpg

Next step will be setting the edge thickness. Stay tuned...

Edited by Lukas MG
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 60
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Thanks guys, glad you enjoy this!   @MSchneider: I grind in the rough distal taper before grinding the bevels, after setting the edge thickness. Then I grind the bevels and once the basic geometry

Grinding the blade bevels with the angle grinder. One side done, the other half way. I left some more meat in the fullered part, too easy to slip with the angle grinder and ruin the blade there. The r

Hi Lukas,   You really seem to go for the long-pointed, cut/thrust, rather than "dedicated cutters" blade profiles.

Posted Images

I think I need to start planning my builds the way you do and having a working scaled drawing beforehand! As with all of your builds I'm looking forward to seeing how this one progresses, and that fuller is cleaaaaaaan! :D Fantastic start my friend!

Link to post
Share on other sites

off and running. love to see these progress.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, glad you enjoy this!

 

@MSchneider: I grind in the rough distal taper before grinding the bevels, after setting the edge thickness. Then I grind the bevels and once the basic geometry is established, I refine the shape until the final distal taper and cross section is achieved.

 

I had originally thought leaving the end of the fuller rectangular would be sufficient to get a nice transition once distal taper and bevels were ground in but after some playing around with a wooden dummy, I found that this only works if the thickness of the blade after the fuller is not thicker than the web between the fullers (makes sense once you think about it, too). Otherwise there is a noticeable "step up" in the blade thickness. Since on this sword the fuller is only in the base and the blade stays thicker, I had to go back and grind a "lift-off", gradually tapering the fuller out.
I took the chance to shot some pics of my fullering set up as well. The idea for this was originally thought of by Dave Stephens.
P1011589.jpg
P1011590.jpg
P1011591.jpg
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is the blade with the edge thickness set and the rough distal taper ground in with the angle grinder. The blade is still 1mm too thick for most of its length, the final thinning will happen once the bevels are ground in and the cross section established. Distal tapering a blade is much like tillering a bow, you have to slowly remove material until the flex is right. So after doing the heavy lifting with the angle grinder, the rest has to wait until the final geometry is there.


You can also see my new anvil. I got it fairly cheaply on ebay, after unsuccessfully looking for one in my neighborhood for a long time. I needed a fairly small one that I can move around. This one has around 75kg. It came covered in rust but otherwise in excellent condition, no cracks, dents or anything. Has a beautiful clear and loud ring. I polished the face and gave it a good oiling. And guess what? After cleaning it, I was able to make out the maker's mark. It says: "Original P.F.P." It's a Peddinghaus!! Whohooo!! Those are top-of the line anvils and go for WAY more than I paid for this one :) I'm stoked!


P1011596.jpg


P1011595.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that anvil was a crazy luck find. Can't wait to try it out :D Need to find a stump to mount it first though. And get some large magnets, that thing rings LOUD.

Edited by Lukas MG
Link to post
Share on other sites
Grinding the blade bevels with the angle grinder. One side done, the other half way. I left some more meat in the fullered part, too easy to slip with the angle grinder and ruin the blade there. The rest will be done on the belt sander.

The blade is starting to come to life, it is loosing a lot of weight and begins to feel like a sword.

----

small side-note: the other sword in that pic is a H/T longsword blade that I hilted up years ago. It actually was the very first project of mine. Horrible thing but I still like it :)


P1011608.jpg


P1011609.jpg


P1011610.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that anvil was a crazy luck find. Can't wait to try it out :D Need to find a stump to mount it first though. And get some large magnets, that thing rings LOUD.

We have our 200 pound Peter Wright mounted on a box made out of 2"x10" boards with a plywood base filled with sand. Settle the sand by shaking vigorously, place a plywood board on top of the sand and set the anvil. No ring, no bounce.

 

Anvil stand.JPG

 

Anvil stand (2).JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Joshua, thanks for the pic. I will probably try to get a nice tree stump for it and put some dampening layers between the anvil and the wood (I have heard of people using tar paper or such). Seems easier than extra building a box, getting sand, etc. Also, I need to move it around a bit (that's why I got a fairly small anvil in the first place), adding several dozen pounds of sand won't help in that regard :) But I will keep it in mind.

 

@ Peter, thank you. Yes, that lift-off was definitively the right thing to do. I'm just glad I made a wooden dummy before continuing on the sword, I would have hated myself for ruining a blade because of not thinking and planning it through properly...

Edited by Lukas MG
Link to post
Share on other sites

excellent move. Faster is not always more efficient, is it?

 

great anvil, too.

 

kc

Link to post
Share on other sites
The blade is ready for heat treat. I'm really happy with how the fuller turned out and I learned a bunch that will make the next one easier (like going to 240 or 400 grit when initially grinding in the fullers and not once the bevels are already in place).


P1011617.jpg


P1011620.jpg


P1011622.jpg


I have also now determined the necessary pommel weight. I do this by taping the guard in place and then adding different weights to the tang end until the harmonics are on target. This sword needs a pommel weight of around 300g, the roughed out pommel sits at 330g so I still have a bit material to remove.


P1011611.jpg


P1011614.jpg


Blade weight currently is 1040g, the completed sword will be around 1500g.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lukas - I am really digging the project. I may never make a longsword, but I will probably make a 2-handed jian, and from the available fight manuals for each, they were likely used almost the same.

 

Needless to say, I will be borrowing some of your ideas. I love the tuning of the sword system with the pommel.

 

kc

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, I'm glad you find this helpful. I forgot to post pics of how I grind my blades, I will do that next week (currently away from the shop for the weekend). Might be interesting for some because I haven't seen anyone else grinding exclusively lengthwise, not across the platen (not that I think nobody else does it, it just seems to be not so present).

 

Also, my first pinned thread! I'm honored! :D

 

@ Kevin: I could well see two-handed jeans be used very similarly to longswords... though I can imagine the lack of long cross guard changing certain techniques quite substantially.

Edited by Lukas MG
Link to post
Share on other sites

I pinned this thread because there is so much good information, the same reason I pin any thread.

 

You might be surprised how many sword makers do at least some grinding vertically on the platen. It just makes sense for a long tapered flat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some bad pics of the pommel fresh off the belt sander. Still need to hand sand it, that will take care of all remaining irregularities in the hollow ground bevels.

 

P1011628.jpg

 

P1011634.jpg

 

Also, here's how I grind my blades, I practically never grind across the platen, only lengthwise. On swords that is. The few knifes I make, I do grind "as usual" across the platen. (Blade pictured is not the longsword)

 

P1011625.jpg

 

P1011626.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...