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Damascus Curiosity


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At work we have a 175X Optical camera for inspecting machine inserts. When I had a chance, I took a pic of some beginners damascus I made from pallet banding and band saw stock to inspect my welds. My curiosity got peaked when I saw the 'squish out' between the layers. Can someone tell me what this is? I'm not worried about it or anything, just really curious as to what it might be. Thanks

 

 

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Yes. For working in a technical field, 'squish out' was the only thing that came to mind at the moment. My mother would be ashamed of me, haha. Very Interesting! I never really thought about being able to see the decarb as a tangible layer between the different steels. Thank you for the info, gentlemen.

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the weld zone can have all sorts of weird and interesting things happening, as well as the decarb and Boron alloying mentioned you will always get a small amount of traped flux in the joint. once the weld is forged out some it begins to distribute these oddity's and by distributing them over a larger area it makes then less visible the more the welds are drawn out.

MP

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I believe this was an effect that we talked about between scenes at the first Arctic Fire, do you recall Dave? The take away that I got was that it could be minimized or eliminated by welding without a fluxing agent. Not having access to magnification I haven't collected any data so please take this as pure speculation.

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I believe this was an effect that we talked about between scenes at the first Arctic Fire, do you recall Dave? The take away that I got was that it could be minimized or eliminated by welding without a fluxing agent. Not having access to magnification I haven't collected any data so please take this as pure speculation.

 

Michael -- I believe you are correct.

 

If I recall correctly, Kevin Cashen ran some flux vs. fluxless welding tests and noticed that fluxless did not produce the effect. I may be "misremembering." If I'm not, however, it would seem to indicate that it's not decarb but boron alloying and trapped flux as Alan and Matthew were describing. Right?

 

Dave

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at 50-100x flux inclusions are visible, even with university level equipment boron is difficult to find. the white line you can get along welds is most likely from boron, but as far as I know that has never been proven. I do know that none of these effects show up with fluxless welds, thought you can get a decarb zone along the weld line, that very quickly homogenizes (a heat or two.)

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at 50-100x flux inclusions are visible, even with university level equipment boron is difficult to find. the white line you can get along welds is most likely from boron, but as far as I know that has never been proven. I do know that none of these effects show up with fluxless welds, thought you can get a decarb zone along the weld line, that very quickly homogenizes (a heat or two.)

True....I have been trying to get a Univ to look at this for years. All else is a guess.

Ric

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