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Kris Lipinski

Bearded axe (oblique/slanting?)

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Hi All.

Today I finished a bearded axe. Before I managed to forge this type of axe I f*****d two :excl: "Learning must cost", as my Dad says :) But finally I did it, and It's done with historical technicques. I documented some steps - particulary those I consider more difficult. Tomorrow at daylight I'll take some better pictures of finished axe. Over the weekend I'll put it on my blog as well.

It is raw, not everyone likes this look but I do :D

 

Edit:

Material is wrought iron, the cutting edge is low alloy tool steel NCV1 (approx. 0,75-0,85 C).

Toporek bearded axe.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 1.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 2.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 3.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 4.jpg

Bearded axe 1.jpg

Bearded axe 2.jpg

Edited by Kris Lipinski
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Kris,

I love the look of the iron...the flow.

Jan

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That's beautiful! The third picture is very bird-like in form.

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I do like that wrought iron look. Could you provide some dimensions? Both for the starting piece and the finished axe.

 

Thanks.

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Oh, yes, I will put some precise informations when preparing a post for my blog and some better pictures as well. It is small - hand size, inspired by finding from Lipowiec (south Poland). Probably such axes were used for throwing/hurling like tomahawks. Later I,m gonna put it for sale - maybe the costs of learning will be refunded :)

And that is the drawing od the original artifact:

(the bottom one, no 7)

 

Topory.jpg

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Some more pictures of finished axe. One of them shows dimentions. The weight is about 305-310grams (10,7-11oz).

 

Some more pictures on my blog:

http://lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com/2016/02/toporek-wczesnosredniowieczny-bearded.html

 

I've just put it for sale:

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=33039

Toporek bearded axe 9.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 12.jpg

Toporek bearded axe 13.jpg

Edited by Kris Lipinski
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Holy shit that is cool Kris!

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Thanks Wes. Its an honour to be apreciated by masters.

Joshua, What I missed: the starting piece for the "batarang" (eye) was flat bar 50mm x 10mm x 80mm (2" x 2/5" x 3 1/5") and forging this element was the most dificult at first. Actually I started with clay to work out the movements.

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Thanks Wes. Its an honour to be apreciated by masters.

 

 

Haha, thanks for that, but it is so far from the truth I don't even know where to begin :) But thanks!

 

More to the point, that is some really excellent forging and an excellent axe.

Edited by Wes Detrick

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It is very cool and an excellent reproduction of the original. I was wondering why it had an odd shape, and now I know.

Well done sir!

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I had never seen one with the oblique eye like that until you posted the book, thanks! Sort of a bearded axe/Francesca hybrid. I can see the extra reach coming in handy on the battlefield.

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It seemed odd to me as well. Actually the customer, who re-enacts middle ages explained what that shape used to be used for. And I undertook his order. Then I realized how difficult is to forge such a construction. I failed twice. This one is ok, I'm really glad of it, but ti's not exactly within the dimentions, angle, and proportions as the customer wishes, so I put this one for sale. The guy pays fair money for the item, so it has to be done prcisely according to his expectations :)

Edited by Kris Lipinski

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This is really cool! Is the eye a teardrop shape, or did you forge weld the eye smaller and drift it out? I want to make something like this one day, and it seems like it would be easier to keep the eye a teardrop shape and just carve the handle to fit that shape.

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The eye needs to be big enough to avoid streching the material when you finally shape it. I learned it by snapping two eyes when I was widening it by hammering a round bar into it. And the eye ("batarang") needs to be thicker, as when you forge weld it to the body it burns on surface and gets thiner.

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Nice work!

When I see these forward reaching axe heads with angled eye/haft I think of the Norwegian peasant militia axes from the 1600´s.

I cannot help thinking that this type of haft must have seen use in other areas and time periods as well...
Not many preserved hafts to go by, unfortunately. For a fighting axe this type of hafting makes sense in several ways it seems to me.

 

arms_and_armour_-_europe_20101126_1832879562.jpg

 

IMG_0352_overall1.jpg

 

dUvwT.jpg

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Peter, those are almost like a precursor to the halberd. If there was a little more spike at the bottom of the beard, a footsoldier might be able to take a horseman down from his mount.

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Peter. Those axes look odd. :lol: They seem to be pretty heavy. The axe I was reconstructing is very small. The previous one's weight was 305g, and this one's is 335g. And I still made them slightly bigger than original finds!

Actually I made another axe closer to the shape and proportions of the original one.

I put it on my blog as well.

http://lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com/2016/03/toporek-z-lipowca-bearded-axe-from.html

 

 

Oblique bearded axe 4.jpg

Oblique bearded axe 5.jpg

Oblique bearded axe 6.jpg

Oblique bearded axe 7.jpg

Oblique bearded axe 10.jpg

Oblique bearded axe 12.jpg

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