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Question - Decent Pneumatic engraver?


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I just watched a video on hand engraving, and I wanted to ask where one might aquire a decent air engraver? Price is somewhat of an issue, and since I have not done this before I will not break the bank in an attempt to aquire the best. :)

 

Even so, I've had a look at some cheap Chinese made air engravers - but I do not know how they actually perform.

 

Sincerely, Alveprins.

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As Dan suggests, the mode of powering the graver or chisel is down the scale of important issues confronting the beginning engraver. Of absolute critical importance is a grasp of tool geometry and gaining basic proficiency at making lines of varied quality in metal. After that, your artistry and gaining further control are all that limits your progress.

 

I would highly recommend a basic proficiency in hammer and chisel and palm burin as a start, to see if you have a taste for it and can grasp the basics of tool geometry. Then explore the various power options. My understanding is that the Chinese options are not worth the $ savings. I personally prefer the Lindsay.

 

Some links for further elaboration:

 

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index.php?/topic/1786-engraving-basics/page__hl__gravers

 

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index.php?/topic/35-gravers/page__hl__dowel+graver

 

There are other threads to find by searching.

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Thank you very much for your input DanM and Jim Kelso. :)

 

I've been considering getting into engraving simply to put that last touch on my knives. This is something I'll get into in the not too distant future though, and not right away. Right now I wish to do gold inlay into my etched logo, and I suppose I will have to do the neccesary cutting work inside the etch by hand. This way I'll get a bit more familiar with the process of cutting in steel as well.

 

I work every day with making and sharpening high presicion tungsten carbide tools for the aerospace industry, so I have a good grasp of the importance of geometry. I will thus be able to make my own carbide tools from scratch at work. ;)

 

As for pneumatic engravers - my own research also concludes that the Lindsay Airgraver is most likely the best choice for when that time comes. It is however pricey. I will attempt to sell a few knives and see if I can finance it that way. ^_^

 

Great links btw. I'll be checking in on those engraving forums later. Right now - I need to go continue on my damascus billet. :lol:

 

Sincerely, Alveprins.

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  • 7 months later...

There are only two decent hand engraving machines that i know of in the few weeks I've been researching. One is from grs & the other is lindsay airgraver. Both have cheaper & more expensive versions. You'll still need other things as well, such as magnifier, oil free compressor, graver guides & sharpener, vice, etc. if not, grs has chisel gravers & hand push gravers.

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I'm currently only a few weeks into engraving as far as learning everything & a few days into actual engraving. The gravers that i bought slip continuously during hand push method. The only success ive had was using those gravers & a silver smithing type wiggling action on a piece of bronze. Next I'll try some carbide ones w/ different angle, as many ppl on the forums & in books recommend different graver angles so it's hard to find what is actually going to work for me.

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  • 2 months later...

I have a Chinese knockoff engraving machine. It was $275, but it didn't work when I got it. I had to take it apart completely to get it to work.

There were so many assembly problems like the pressure regulator was installed wrong, the speed control wasn't installed, the air hoses leak etc.

Even with all the mods it still isn't great.

See here:

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=34540

 

The first thing that got me anywhere with engraving was the Lindsay sharpening system of templates and diamond laps. Getting the face and heel angle right makes a huge difference in the ability to cut lines with any control. It takes about an hour to learn how to sharpen them, then you can tune the heel length and face angle to what feels best. I'm using square HSS gravers, no cobalt or carbide.

 

If you sharpen a graver and don't add a heel, it really won't glide or do much of anything you want it to.

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