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Mountain man Folder Custom Special


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Hello gents

 

This folder was made for a gents recent birthday. The handle is Sambar stag which I dyed with mahogany leather dye, cleaned back and sealed with Danish oil. The blade is forged from EN43, it's 100mm long, approx 3mm thick at the spine. Open length of the knife is 235mm.

The back spring was forged from a leaf spring and has file work along it's outside edges. Because the customer wanted a gun blued end cap for this folder I used brass washers under the rivets this time as a contrast to all of the steel.

The saddle is planished steel and finished a plum brown and topped off with a brass rose. The finger ring has been twisted this time for a more textured look.

Thank you for taking the time to look, all questions and comments very welcome.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

 

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Edited by Steve Nowacki
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While the whole thing looks great, it is the ring that makes me want to ask if you have any tips on how to get it so uniform? I have terrible luck twisting things, but you sure seem to have the technique down. I bet you're reading this and thinking "with all the other stuff in there THAT is what I'm getting asked?!", and yes. All that file work makes my hands cramp up just thinking about the effort to get it so clean. :D

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The size is deceptive guys, as the actress said to the bishop.

Jerrod all I did was hammer flats onto some 3.25mm carbon steel welding rod, once I was happy that everything looked square I held one end in the vice, clamped some mole grips to the other end then heated the bar up and started to twist. If it looked like it was twisting more in one place than another I moved the heat source to adjust the twists.

Thank you for your comments gents.

 

Regards

 

Steve

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Definitely, slow, steady and keep the heat even. We've all had failure's but that's how we progress.

 

Regards

 

Steve

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Morning Gents

 

The ring could be used to pull the knife from your pocket or a pouch sheath definitely, it doesn't serve any real mechanical purpose. I suppose you'd call this style a slip joint folder? On other designs the finger ring is used to lift the back spring to unlock the blade so you can shut the knife. The first one of these folders I made, the customer asked me if I could remove the finger ring for him and relace it with some braided leather because when he carried the knife on his hip the finger ring kept knocking against the back spring making a noise. I think originally these folders would have been carried in your possibles bag and a large fixed bladed knife on your hip for hunting.

 

Thank you for taking the time to look and comment guys.

 

All the best

 

Steve

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Beautiful work Steve. This is just the kind of thing that speaks to me.

 

On the back spring, often times this style of knife includes a lock, in which case the ring on the back provides purchase to pull back the spring and unlock the blade so it can be closed. You can kind of see how this sort of mechanism works on a folder I did a couple of years back: http://www.rhinometalworks.com/spring.html.

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Hi David

 

I've seen that folder before, beautiful work I really like the way the spring coils around the antler, very serpentine. I agree totally with you that these style of folders have so much character. I'd like to ask how did you patina the blade, was it with mustard, if so what type and how long did you leave it on for. I don't know if the type of mustard would make any difference but I'd thought I'd ask. I hope you don't mind the questions.

 

All the best

 

Steve

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Hi Steve.

 

The patina on my little folder is indeed a mustard finish. I'd like to take credit for the technique, but, alas, I stole it from a very talented and generous bladesmith by the name of Michael Rader in Washington State.

 

The process is beyond easy. It works better if the entire blade is hardened; for some reason, where there is a differential heat treatment and part of the blade is left soft, the finish doesn't take nearly as well on the unhardened part. First, finish the blade to 400 grit or so, and clean the blade so there's no oil, fingerprints, or dirt. Next, using a tooth pick, q-tip, or small brush, apply little blobs of mustard to the blade. I use inexpensive French's yellow mustard, but I don't think it matters much, as long as it's a fine paste without whole mustard seeds. Leave some space between the blobs of mustard; you'll get those on the next pass. Hang the blade up somewhere warm and dry, and go watch tv or play with the kids. After a couple of hours, the mustard will dry and turn blackish. Clean off the dried mustard with soap and water, and then repeat the process until you're satisfied with the results. The pattern of the patina will depend on the shape and density of the blobs of mustard you put on the metal. I use the dull end of a wooden shishkebab skewer to apply the mustard, and I make little tiny round chocolate chip shaped blobs, maybe 1/16th of an inch in diameter. Getting a good, dense patina usually takes three to five mustard applications, and the pattern gets progressively darker and denser as you continue.

 

One thing about this patination process that I've never been able to figure out is that, sometimes it results in a rainbow sort of opalescence to the surface, which is really pretty. For me, sometimes this happens, and sometimes it doesn't, and I've never been able to figure out why or what to do to force that outcome. Maybe one day I'll run into a metallurgist who can explain that phenomenon to me. (And, if you somehow figure out how to make it happen, please let me know!)

 

Hope this is of some help.

Edited by David Kahn
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I have had that rainbow effect happen to simple carbon steels (1084 especially) after using them to cut red meat. I think it has to do with the fatty acids and the simple alloys. I have never had it happen on any chromium or nickel alloy.

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Hi Dave

 

Thank you for the explanation buddy that's spot on. The only change I would make is using strong English mustard :D I'd only use French mustard on my Salami sandwich.

 

All the best

 

Steve

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Confusingly, the French's mustard to which I referred is actually an American brand of prepared mustard: http://www.frenchs.com/products/mustard/. I think I've usually used their "Classic Yellow" mustard, but I'm sure you can find something just as tasty (and useful for etching metal) in the U.K.

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Cheers Dave

 

Your info was very precise, I think the reason I've not had much luck with the mustard finish before is that I've not applied the mustard over several applications and built the finish up. Just being to impatient I guess.

Thanks again

 

Steve

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