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Introduction + Pattern Welded Work


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Hello,

First of all I will introduce myself:


In short, My name is Eric and I hail from The Green Mountain State. I use coal for fuel, arm-power for air and hammer, and I do all my forging outside under a little shed roof (which can be brutal in the winter ((despite the lack-there-of this year)). I am almost entirely self taught from books, this forum, and a whole lot of trial and error. On the note of "this forum", I have a whole lot of thanks to give out. When I started experimenting with pattern-welding I utilized these pages as my primary and frequent resource along with a few books that are amazing in their own right. The wealth of knowledge, passion, and generosity given for free by the members of this forum astounds me- there really isn't anything else quite like it. The inspiration I find here seems endless. So, thank you to those that make it possible and contribute.


When I am not working on other metalworking commissions I practice bladesmithing, making hand tools for woodworking, and sculpture. Almost exactly one year ago I became obsessed with pattern-welded steel. I can't quite explain it, but I love the process- magic to say the least. Each piece seems to teach me more than last.


Anyway, enough of that... here are some photos of recent work and a little info about them. I have a lot of process shots from the pattern welded blade if there is interest, but I won't post any here. I hope to continue to post and not just lurk as the questions never cease to emerge for me.


Pattern Welded Blade:

Total Length: 8.25"

Blade Length: 4"

Blade Material: 21 layers 1084 + recycled bandsaw blade steel

Handle Material: Rosewood

Copper Fitting & Brass Pin


DSC01938 EDIT.jpg


DSC01942 EDIT.jpg


DSC01943 EDIT 2.jpg



Pattern Welded Drawknife:

Blade Length: 6"

Blade Material: 252 layers composite recycled metal file and bandsaw blade steel.

Handle Material: Walnut

Steel Pins


DSC01706 EDIT.jpg


DSC01715 EDIT.jpg



Pattern Welded Small Kitchen Blade: I had a lot of trouble with this, especially because the smallest nick to the Manzanita bark and it was gone forever. That also meant no shaping the sides of the wood. Also the etch came out super weird- I tried to fix it, made it worse, and gave up. More of an experimental piece I guess.


Blade Length: 4.5"

Blade Material: 252 layers recycled jackhammer bit and bandsaw blade steel.

Handle Material: Manzanita

Brass Pins


4 Pattern Welded Knife 2.jpg



Pattern Welded Small Blade:

Blade Length: 3"

Blade Material: 120 layer recycled metal file and bandsaw blade steel

Handle Material: Curly Maple

Steel Pins


DSC01533 EDIT.jpg



Thanks for taking the time to peak,

Eric
Edited by Eric Dennis
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Great looking knives. I'm always impressed when I see someone drawing out damascus by hand. The draw knife in particular makes my arm hurt just thinking about it. Nice work.

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Thanks-

An average size starting billet for me is approx. 1"x1.5"x4" , about the size my forge can handle without being pushed too much. I work pretty slow, so after cutting and re-stacking a couple times its usually 4.5 hours later give or take. I also use this little guy to help me out setting welds and doing some brute work:

 

DSC01960.JPG

 

-Eric

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You are getting some pretty nice results for hand forging your PW steel. Keep the photos and stuff coming, I really like your work.

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well there goes my excuse for poor welds( I dont have a press or trip hammer)! For a begginer with no power tools, well even if you weren't a begginer. You are making some great stuff! Don't ever get too good to turn junk into such beautiful blades. I love the episodes of FiF where guys say I've never made a knife out of........( add you own scrap metal here) while I'm thinking I've never had the luxury not to.

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Thanks-

An average size starting billet for me is approx. 1"x1.5"x4" , about the size my forge can handle without being pushed too much. I work pretty slow, so after cutting and re-stacking a couple times its usually 4.5 hours later give or take. I also use this little guy to help me out setting welds and doing some brute work:

 

attachicon.gifDSC01960.JPG

 

-Eric

Got to love that handle, it looks like it has about three positions on the hanlde. There it the love tap position, the getting serious, and the killer postion!! LOL Never saw one with that design. How much weight you got in the head????

 

Love the Damascus! Two thumbs up!!!

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Ha, you got that right about the different grips.

 

I usually first pick it up eight inches back and each heat find myself inching forward a few inches until I'm holding the thing right at the neck, and my forearms are still burning. It's an old 8-pound sledge head I had lying around so I carved a handle for it. I find it's really useful for getting deep compression in the billet when a lighter hammer would be too much concentrated force with a higher potential for the layers shearing or not sticking like they should.

 

Eric

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Great things! I think it's very god idea to practice with forging such staff by hand - without power hammer or press. You've achieved really high level, so when you get some "helper" it will be just a stronger hand to do what you already can do perfectly. That's what I think, as I've forged by hand so far as well :rolleyes:

I wish you the power hammer to appear in you workshop! :D

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