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Hello all. Tomorrow, I will be starting another project. This one's going to be a good one, which I need a little advice on. A good friend of mine wants a tomahawk based on the one in the movie The Patriot. From research I've done, it was supposed to be a peace pipe tomahawk given to Benjamin Martin from the Cherokee. My friend wants this to be a fully functioning piece. I have done one or two railroad spike tomahawks in the past, but nothing quite like this, although I have always wanted to. So, I am looking for any advice on this project. I will try to get as many photos as possible for this build. Thanks in advance.

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The hawk in the movie was made by Joe Szilaski, and is based on one found on pages 105 and 106 of "Accouterments" by James R. Johnston. No Cherokee connection, it is engraved "Chw Duke, Lt. 26 Gren" and "Toronto 1793." In other words it was carried a a member of the 26th light grenadiers in British Canada some ten years after the end of the revolution, but it's a lovely hawk. I have made a couple of them myself. The filework is brutal, you've been warned! :lol: Cutting a rounded edge in relief takes patience and a sure hand, and those little lozenges are a bear as well. Szilaski got around that by turning them into nails rather than the fileworked raised relief of the original. You can buy a wax casting of the original head somewhere online if you want a study piece.

 

Clay Miller's hawk head left.jpg

 

On the original the head is 7 inches from bowl to edge with a 3-inch edge, the handle is straight-grain ash 19 1/2 inches long, very finely incise-carved with running scrollwork on the left side and a canoe, two birds, an indian warrior, and a horse on the other.

 

Good luck!

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Alan, I want to sincerely thank you for the information. So, this is a pipe 'hawk then? I guess I was looking in all the wrong places for info. Looks like I have alot of work ahead of me, this ought to be fun. :)

Edited by R.W. Deavers
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It is a pipe hawk, but the mouthpiece end of the handle is not typical in that it's a rounded lump rather than a mouthpiece.

 

I made the one in the picture as a hammer poll at the request of the owner. Whichever type, I always do them as a separate part and thread and braze the bowl/poll in place. The originals use both that method and the far more difficult one-piece method. Ihave made exactly one one-piece pipe hawk head and I put it in an iron-in-the-hat event because I didn't like it.

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Good hawk. Movie was utter crap, but good hawk.

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Ok, I am not too smart.

Where exactly, are the areas that can be replaced by shaped nail head?

 

I may want to steal that idea, I mean, pay homage to the great masters who came before.

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Just curious...that "nail head" won't really be used to nail the head to the haft will it? Stupid question I'm sure,

but I ask only because most old pipe hawk heads were not actually nailed on.

tc

Edited by TC Albert
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1.25" x .25" x 11.5" flat 1020 for the body, 1" x .25" 1084 for the edge, .75" round 1070 for the hammer poll. If it were to have been a pipe bowl I'd use .75" 1020 and turn and bore it on the lathe, filing the flats after threading and brazing. The way I do it for a simple wrapped hawk is a pinned topic in Hot Work, "Forging a tomahawk my way."

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Thank you again, Alan. Like I said before, other than a few railroad spike tomahawks, I haven't tried a traditional one yet and this will be a good learning experience, so you're input is highly appreciated along with others.

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Here's pics of the original from the book;

Tomahawks and Frontiersmen Axes by Hartzler and Knowles

pg-122.jpg

Thanks to my late compadre, Gib Guignard , for the scans

 

PS Alan - I need to talk with you about something important - would you please send me your phone number and a good time to call I'm on Mtn Time - 2 hour difference chuck@wrtcleather.com

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Could try a PM please - my email's been whonky for a while now. And yep doing inlays would be a LOT easier than my normal file work it relief out of the parent material like this

pipehawk-pulich-1-2.jpg

 

and yep I do miss Gib often althought it looks like I may be seeing him soonly.....

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Coming back after holiday with family.

 

Thanks for explaining the nail thing. Inlay, for those who are good at it, seems a good way to go. I have so much to learn.

 

This is a great thread.

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Okay, after much research and asking questions, I finally got started today. I must say, I always get a little nervous when I have to forge weld, so when I do, I take things slow so as to try and not mess something up. So far, things are going good (thanks Alan). In the first picture, I got the bar bent and rough shaped, ready for welding. Yes, I tacked both sides together so that nothing shifted. The second picture shows more progress after taking a good heat. In the third, I am starting to work the shape. Hopefully, tomorrow will come with more pictures of progress.

 

hawk progress 1.JPG

 

hawk progress 2.JPG

 

hawk progress 3.JPG

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