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Three disparate (not desperate) questions.


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Thanks for your time reading this post.

 

1- How do I access the pages that used to be on the dfoggknives forum?

 

2- If you solder an etched wrought iron guard on a knife how do you clean up the excess solder? Without having to "touch up" the guard. Not get any solder on it? I guess...

 

3- Quenching a backsword. This is still a long way off for me but I'm thinking about it now... When you quench a single edge sword how do you keep the spine straight? Not side to side straight but not curved like a saber or katana. My assumption is that you pre-bend it.

 

Thanks for your help guys.

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1) See Alan's post (#9) here.

2) After avoiding getting messy to begin with, people often suggest a brass/bronze scraper. Something harder than the solder, but softer than the base material.

3) A variety of ways, including pre-curving. Alloy and quench media selection is also important. When searching for tips on this you'll probably want to use the Japanese term "sori".

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Thanks Jerrod, I just wonder if you got solder on an etched wrought iron guard would you be able to clean it off without ruining the etched surface of the wrought iron.

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Depends on what you do with your etched surface and how much of a mess you make. Are you doing a really heavy etch? Bluing at all?

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Another reason the Katana curves so much is because crystal structure, the edge of the sword is usually hottest when quenched so it hardens the most and the spine compresses because of that, so you get the curve. It can also help to quench the sword vertically tip first.

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Thanks guys,

Jerrod, I haven't got that far yet, now that you mention it it will probably be a fairly light etch and not blued, just so you can see that it's wrought. I'm looking for an aged look, the blade is going to be force patina-ed.

Thanks Daniel

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Another reason the Katana curves so much is because crystal structure, the edge of the sword is usually hottest when quenched so it hardens the most and the spine compresses because of that, so you get the curve. It can also help to quench the sword vertically tip first.

This is actually a common misconception, which has a little scientific fact that would make it seem right, but it isn't. Martensite is indeed a little bigger than pearlite, so an edge would theoretically take more volume after hardening than before, while a soft spine takes the same volume before and after. But the reason this isn't really what is happening is because of the thermal expansion and contraction being so large and the resulting edge microstructure just gets stressed. Take a look at the video in this thread. The edge cools first and fast, and the shrinking from thermal contraction is a lot more than the growing from martensite formation. That is why it curves down first. Then the spine finally cools down and shrinks enough to bring the tip back up. If you can control your cooling rates you can control the curving. That requires the right metal, quenchant, heat distribution, and geometry. In general, picking the slowest cooling possible will get you the most stable geometry. So if you want a single edge sword to not curve, pick something that can handle a slow oil quench and still get hard.

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If you don't want your sword to curve then make sure your spine and edge is the same temp going into the quench, and don't put something on the back of blade that will hold heat there. So don't use clay, and make sure you heat is even. I have trouble with all my sword attempts twisting and bending side to side. Never had one sabre unless I wanted it to.

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I have not made a sword ever--- so take this with a grain of salt.. But as to how i understand it... I heard that a horizontal quench like the one in the linked video inhibits curving, where a vertical one do not all things being equal.

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I have not made a sword ever--- so take this with a grain of salt.. But as to how i understand it... I heard that a horizontal quench like the one in the linked video inhibits curving, where a vertical one do not all things being equal.

Inhibits means prevents. I think you mean induces, which means to cause. And it does play into it, if your cross section isn't too different. You have to make sure your heat is distributed properly too. It is all about cooling rate.

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And an oil quench tend to cause nosedive, not sori, especially in strongly wedge-shaped cross sections. If the blade is wide and thin it shouldn't be too bad. I always do a vertical quench on swords, it just works better.

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