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I just finished heat treating the second Wolf's Tooth Spear. Here is a quick photo:

 

spear2.jpg

 

This is the one where all steps are video documented.

 

Let me know what you think.

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As of yesterday - I hope you don't mind the big picture.  

I just finished heat treating the second Wolf's Tooth Spear. Here is a quick photo:     This is the one where all steps are video documented.   Let me know what you think.

Awesome! Looking forward to that video

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  • 4 weeks later...

Wonderful Niels! I very much look forward to seeing how you do it!

I've just the other day begun to mess around and try to get a similar result, it will be interesting to see how our methods vary!

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I could use some suggestions on how to bring out the pattern. My regular ferric chloride treatment does not generate enough contrast. Any ideas?

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Wonderful work, Niels!

 

Option 1: Just etch the heck out of it. Give it 15 minute soak, scrub off oxides, repeat until desired depth is reached. Clean with WD-40 and a brass brush, polish with 0000 steel wool and/or flitz or another paste abrasive.

 

Option 2: Do option #1, but then afterwards instead of the steel wool/flitz, give it a buff with a light grit rouge, clean with acetone, then coat with cold gun blue. Sand with 2000 grit+ sandpaper with a hard rubber sanding block. The "valleys" will be very dark. The "peaks" will be lightened.

 

Option 3: After the last etch, don't scrub off the oxides but pour boiling water over the blade to set them. Never done this method, but Alan swears it works, so if it doesn't work, blame him! (;

 

Luck!

 

Dave

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I can attest to Dave's methods 1 and 3. Never had any luck with the cold blue, although with wrought iron, if you etch deeply and back the paper with something really hard (I use a file with the teeth ground off) you, "should," get good results.

 

Boiling water really does set the oxides a bit. I don't remember the chemical change, but there is one. I have blackened fittings that way.

 

I really love the spear, and even more, I am impressed by your commitment and patience. Thanks for taking the time to make such relaxing and educational videos, too. My stepson and I have really enjoyed watching them together.

 

He is getting a good introduction to knife making from watching videos, reading fora, and playing in the shop with me. Maybe someday he will decide to give it an honest try.

 

Anyway, thanks for sharing so much with us. As Peter said, these practical attempts at recreating the beautiful and fierce style of our ancestors have been to good effect. There is an increase in understanding, and also in appreciation, of this sort of work. I think it is due, in no small part, to your efforts and those of many of our brethren. Damn fine work.

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
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Kevin -- I should have noted that the cold blue method only works well with low layer patterns, like the twists in the middle. You need broad "peaks" to protect the "valleys" from the sanding.

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