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On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 10:51 AM, Dave Stephens said:

Kevin -- I should have noted that the cold blue method only works well with low layer patterns, like the twists in the middle. You need broad "peaks" to protect the "valleys" from the sanding.

We use cold blue a lot with low layer patterns like in Damascus axe's..Also helps bring out cable pattern real well.

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As of yesterday - I hope you don't mind the big picture.  

I just finished heat treating the second Wolf's Tooth Spear. Here is a quick photo:     This is the one where all steps are video documented.   Let me know what you think.

Awesome! Looking forward to that video

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What a great video set this is. Thanks for the step by step. I particularly liked the scenes in video #1 when you are angle grinding and the sparks are flying over the Benzomatic torch bottle! ;) Seriously though, great stuff.

BTW-I subscribed a long time ago, but I never get any notifications when you post a new video....:angry:

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Hey Neils, 

Been following vividly on youtube, i even have the alerts set hoping for the next video... Anytime now... :rolleyes:

Good work, keep it up.

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On 3/27/2017 at 6:35 AM, nprovos said:

Thanks. The next one will be on actually welding the socket. An operation I still struggle with - a lot.

I wouldn't have guessed that watching the video!

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Great video, Im just curious do you have a preference using your mandrel like that inside the socket over using a mandrel mounted in your hardy?

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4 hours ago, Philip West said:

Great video, Im just curious do you have a preference using your mandrel like that inside the socket over using a mandrel mounted in your hardy?

The point of inserting the mandrel is to heat it up with the rest of the material. A mandrel on the anvil will suck the heat right out. 

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How do you keep the mandrel from welding to the socket? Does the graphite you coated it with prevent this? I tried to make pipe once and enden with a nice solid bar.:rolleyes:

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I make sure the mandrel has a lot of scale. The flux ends up getting everywhere and made the mandrel bind pretty heavily. I have also heard that others insert a lot of scale directly to prevent that. I am not sure if the graphite actually made much of a difference.

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10 hours ago, nprovos said:

I make sure the mandrel has a lot of scale. The flux ends up getting everywhere and made the mandrel bind pretty heavily. I have also heard that others insert a lot of scale directly to prevent that. I am not sure if the graphite actually made much of a difference.

Great video series, I'm excited to see more! Some folks actually add graphite between surfaces being forged welded to try and add some carbon to the junction, so I don't think it does too much to stop the welding. Would it be possible to forge the mandrel out of 416 stainless or something similar? A steel with a lot of chromium definitely wouldn't want to stick as much. 

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2 hours ago, Aiden CC said:

Some folks actually add graphite between surfaces being forged welded to try and add some carbon to the junction, so I don't think it does too much to stop the welding.

I often use pure graphite spray on the surfaces of my multi-bar pattern welds to avoid those white lines from showing up. It has to be the pure graphite though. If you use the stuff with the silicone additive, the weld will never take.

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On ‎4‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 8:39 PM, nprovos said:

The point of inserting the mandrel is to heat it up with the rest of the material. A mandrel on the anvil will suck the heat right out. 

It does especially on thin stuff. we weld chisel sockets on a mandrel that's set in the anvil. Like in this woodwrights shop/ peter ross video. welding the socket starts about the 8 minute mark but this is a one piece socket and blade not two piece like yours.

http://www.pbs.org/video/2365386383/

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Hi niels, just watched and liked over on YouTube. Great videos, keep them coming. I appreciate your video quality and have no idea how much work it takes but nonetheless think their great.

a question on your power hammer and press, are these self made? If not what brands/type are these? 

Thanks, Chris. 

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The power hammer is a Bullhammer 75. It does not hit all that hard but I quite like it. The company went out of business years ago. The press may be of the harbor freight variety but with a new table.

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