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Geoff Keyes

80crv2

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1 hour ago, Wes Detrick said:

I would say that those Austenizing temps are little high. The bottom end temp is close to what I do at 1525 but that top end temp is a bit high. I would start to worry about grain growth.  Maybe the Vanadium helps counteract that, but still, I would use the bottom end temp.

The temper temps are about spot on for what Jerrod found with my test knife, what the Prof is reporting above.  375 F should give you right about 61/62 RC.  Go a little higher for a big blade.

Was thinking that too. I think I'll try 1550°.  Is it possible you've had good results at lower temperature because you quench it in parks50?

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5 hours ago, Vern Wimmer said:

Does a small, sub 4", blade tempered at 375F, say, flat ground with a micro bevel, pass the brass rod test ?

I can't answer that; I have never made a sub 4" blade out of 80CrV2.  Hell, I don't know that I have ever made a sub 4" anything... But, the large blades I have done in 80CrV2 pass the brass rod test just fine.

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Was thinking that too. I think I'll try 1550°.  Is it possible you've had good results at lower temperature because you quench it in parks50?

This is debatable.  80CrV2 is typically not a steel that people recommend using with Parks because of the alloying agents in it.  I have never cracked a blade in it, but I have read where some people report lower hardness with using it.  I have had good luck with it though.  I think I may ask someone with a hardness tester to test two samples, once quenched in Parks and one is warm Canola and see what we get out of it.

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On 4/27/2016 at 8:06 PM, Wes Detrick said:

 

I use my propane forge, a baffle pipe, and a thermocouple so depending on what you use, your results may vary.

Thanks a bunch for the very detailed guide Wes. I'd love to know more about what kind of thermocouple you use and how it's set up. And what's a baffle pipe? Sounds like you've got your forge dialed in to work almost like a HT oven which I would love to do with my forge.

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55 minutes ago, Connor Lyons said:

Thanks a bunch for the very detailed guide Wes. I'd love to know more about what kind of thermocouple you use and how it's set up. And what's a baffle pipe? Sounds like you've got your forge dialed in to work almost like a HT oven which I would love to do with my forge.

Sure thing, happy to help.  A baffle is a steel pipe that is put inside the forge, and then the knife is placed inside the pipe.  It keeps direct flame off of the blade, and allows a much more even heat on the knife.  Here is the pyrometer and thermocouple that I use.  I have the Type K 8 gauge ceramic probe from the drop down menu.
I am able to do some decent heat treating in my forge, but it is really difficult to sustain a steady temperature over time without a lot of babysitting of the gas regulator and ball valves.  I have since moved to a heat treating oven, which is great (but a lot more expensive).

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5 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

Sure thing, happy to help.  A baffle is a steel pipe that is put inside the forge, and then the knife is placed inside the pipe.  It keeps direct flame off of the blade, and allows a much more even heat on the knife.  Here is the pyrometer and thermocouple that I use.  I have the Type K 8 gauge ceramic probe from the drop down menu.
I am able to do some decent heat treating in my forge, but it is really difficult to sustain a steady temperature over time without a lot of babysitting of the gas regulator and ball valves.  I have since moved to a heat treating oven, which is great (but a lot more expensive).

 Yeah ive attempted to soak some blades before by fiddling around with my regulator and choke on my venturi burner, but without any way to read temp it was kind of futile. Would this same thermocouple be appropriate for use in an electric heat treating oven if I were to eventually build one you think?

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51 minutes ago, Connor Lyons said:

 Yeah ive attempted to soak some blades before by fiddling around with my regulator and choke on my venturi burner, but without any way to read temp it was kind of futile. Would this same thermocouple be appropriate for use in an electric heat treating oven if I were to eventually build one you think?

Yes, it would work, but it's not what you should use.  You would want to make sure you get a PID with a relay instead of that pyrometer.  A PID is programmable and would use the relay to turn the juice off once at temp.

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