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Brass on Ebony Chef


Gabriel James

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another chef completed today Still have some minor flaws but overall very pleased with how this came out. Shout out to Joshua States hidden secret waterfall of the hidden village grinding tips and JJ simons how to not suck at polishing posts. I implemented that in this project. The brass pins in the bolsters are ALMOST invisible. I sanded them with 400g not sure if i forgot to degrease them or not. I can see a semi circle of 1/2 the pins on both sides. Profile and thicknesses were spot on finally. Critique all you like. I still have mucho room for improvement! You guys are sharpening me for sure and I very much appreciate it!

 

 

 

ebonychef.jpg13062375_10153370744160146_852442421150057032_n.jpg

 

 

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Well done.

The lines are pretty good and it looks pretty comfortable in the hand. A real kitchen workhorse.

Other than some little finishing bits, I really like it.

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Thanks guys! After buffing it on my dirty sewn buffing wheel (doh) it revealed a few tiny flaws i will need to correct. But thanks for the compliments!

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Looks good!

 

I'd suggest trying to reduce the secondary bevel a bit. The ideal flat grind for a kitchen knife should take the primary bevel down to nearly nothing, leaving a very, very tiny secondary bevel to just put an edge on.

 

It's one of the things I struggle with all the time.

 

Also, just an aesthetic suggestion, try changing the straight line ending of the brass bolster into something more organic. It's another line that can add character to your piece. Try having it be a half circle that mirrors another curve in the profile of the blade.

 

Finally, I'd go with fewer and smaller pins. Assuming you clamped/epoxied the slabs correctly, you need only a tiny pin or two to keep shear forces from popping the scales from the tang. Three pins in a row are difficult to get in a pleasing arc if you don't have a symmetrical handle. You could just go with one in the middle of the grip, or even go with a triangle with two small pins in the corners of the "pommel" end of the grip, and one near the bolster.

 

Great progress! Keep at it!

 

Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Looks good!

 

I'd suggest trying to reduce the secondary bevel a bit. The ideal flat grind for a kitchen knife should take the primary bevel down to nearly nothing, leaving a very, very tiny secondary bevel to just put an edge on.

 

It's one of the things I struggle with all the time.

 

Also, just an aesthetic suggestion, try changing the straight line ending of the brass bolster into something more organic. It's another line that can add character to your piece. Try having it be a half circle that mirrors another curve in the profile of the blade.

 

Finally, I'd go with fewer and smaller pins. Assuming you clamped/epoxied the slabs correctly, you need only a tiny pin or two to keep shear forces from popping the scales from the tang. Three pins in a row are difficult to get in a pleasing arc if you don't have a symmetrical handle. You could just go with one in the middle of the grip, or even go with a triangle with two small pins in the corners of the "pommel" end of the grip, and one near the bolster.

 

Great progress! Keep at it!

 

Dave

 

 

Actually before i put an edge on this knife my micrometer measured .0025"

Ive tried setting up my crappy grizzly work rest to chamfeur the edge uniformly... always wind up doing it by hand and the secondary bevel grind becomes more elongate than i want. Something im working on still. But despite its smaller cross section i havnt had any issues with chipping as of yet...

 

Ive toyed with just switching the pins around. Mostly just getting rid of the center pin so i dont run into the problem you mentioned. But, currently im somewhat attached to the 1/4" ones (and i bought 15' of them i need to use up :P)

 

Thanks Kenneth and Dave for your comments :P

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You have made some major progress over the last couple of months. Nice work.

 

WRT the edge thickness, the kitchen knives I have made I took to less than 0.010" before adding a secondary bevel. I actually aim for 0.007", but my grinding is still a bit inconsistent, so I am happy as long as I get under 10 thou.

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-Brian

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Ive only sharpened it on the belts so far- it will slice cut paper.. but i generally wait to do food tests until i sharpen and hone on my stones. Ive spent all day making a dang ring :(

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