Jump to content

Grizzly Platen Problems


Aiden CC

Recommended Posts

I've had a Grizzly 2x72 grinder for a while now, and over all it has done what I need it to and been well worth the money. However, the graphite coating on the platen has been giving me some problems. When I track the belt over the edge to cur the insides of curves, make curved plunge cuts, etc. it rips through the graphite pretty fast and over time in the places where I used the platen most (usually the height I had the tool rest set to) the coating is completely dished out. There's a groove all the way down to the steel just from my KITH bowie.

 

I was wondering if others who use or have used this grinder have removed the coating from the platen or made any other modifications to it (like adding a glass of ceramic cover), and if they had any advice on how to make the most out of it. It seems like the graphite is there to get ground up and act as a lubricant for the belt, but don't some other grinders just have the belt rub against a steel platen? I wanted to get some advice before I make a modification that would reduce the functionality of the tool or fling shards of broken ceramic around my shop. Thanks for any advice!

 

Aiden CC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Aiden,

 

I've tried the graphite stick on platen "liners" and found it didn't last at all for me either. So I quit bothering to try. I know a bunch of guys will affix a piece of glass to their metal platen to help extend the platen life. I have a piece I am saving for that but haven't gotten around to it.

Having said all that, I am running my 2x72 on the plain steel platen without issue for several years now and it's holding up well. It's a replaceable part that is made to do so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't say I'm familiar with the Grizzly grinder, but platens do wear out. With a steel platen, you would just have to re-grind it flat, a fairly simple process. With the graphite you will likely have to replace it. I've seen glass platens that glue on, never tried them, but that may work for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My glass platen works well, but needs to be replaced. They do wear out, just takes longer than steel. They are not ordinary glass, they are pyroceram, a ceramic glass that withstands a lot of heat without cracking. It will crack, chip, and break, of course. Common sense dictates adding a ledge to the bottom of the platen to prevent the grenade effect when the epoxy lets go, and I'll do that when I finally replace mine, but the JB Weld on the current setup has lasted at least eight or ten years and is going strong enough I'm a little worried about getting it off when the time comes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had to remove a ceramic liner held by J.B. Weld.

 

I decided to just sacrifice the factory paint and laid it in the coal forge. Get it to a dull red and everything turns loose. Cleaned it up, checked it for true with a piece of 150 grit on a marble slab, then glued up a new one.

 

It's held up for several years, but I've got a chip and a crack, so it'll probably be ready for replacement before long.

 

This is a Grizzly platten by the way... no moving parts or anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the advice! For now, I'll probably just scrape the paint off, though Don, your method of using a forge seems interesting. I may at some point get a piece of ceramic/glass and JB weld it on, but for now I'll see how the bare (I'm guessing the paint will get taken off pretty quickly by the backs of belts) steel does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im pretty rough on tools, my crappy graphite covering was gone from my platen within a week mostly. Ive been cruising with bare metal ever since. I imagine ill have to check for wear spots and correct it in the future.... but at the moment its still fine... and i dont have the extra cheddar to do anything about it currently :P

Ive seen people precision mill tool steel and bolt them on with recessed bolts. I was thinking about something along those lines. Seems more permanent?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's an illustration of how I mounted a ceramic liner on my Grizzly grinder:

 

e86ca367-8fda-455a-b0b6-4215fa348ee6.jpg

 

The green is the factory metal and the hatched area is the ceramic platten.

 

I drilled and tapped for two allen-head bolts then file them flat across the top.

 

This is the "ledge" that Allan spoke of. Without them, the platten would shoot out at full speed should it turn loose.

 

Again, clean surfaces, even coverage of J.B., then clamp it up. Put a couple clamps side-to-side to prevent slipping before it sets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the advice! For now, I'll probably just scrape the paint off, though Don, your method of using a forge seems interesting. I may at some point get a piece of ceramic/glass and JB weld it on, but for now I'll see how the bare (I'm guessing the paint will get taken off pretty quickly by the backs of belts) steel does.

 

Trust me, the difference is well worth the investment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...