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simple full tang hunters for friend's kids


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Hello Everyone,

I am taking a break between jians. Actually, the customer doesn't want any pics of his jian posted, so I can only show the simpler stuff I am working on.

 

I have to admit, these sorts of knives are by far the most fun to make. I just love them. They are my favorite for hunting, too. I hope you like.

 

These are W2 and ziricote. I wish the whole board I had was the same as the top handle. Unfortunately, some of it is not.

 

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Thanks for looking,

 

kc

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Great looking knives! I agree about that style being really fun. When you have a pretty clear idea of the design you want, I find it a lot easier execute it faithfully with a full tang knife made by mostly or entirely stock removal. I also really enjoy making bolsters for full tang knives, especially dovetailed ones. Something about the disappearing pins is still a bit mystical and (at least to me) it looks very classy.

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Nice solid great looking knives Professor! There is something to be said about a well executed simple design like these.

My thoughts exactly. It's the little things like the fact that the bolster pins are truly invisible that add up to making a great knife.

 

Great work Kevin :)

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Kevin! Those look awesome! That hamon on the second one is weirdly bright and fuzzy to me, maybe it's the trick or the light. Either way I like emm both very much.

I am not sure what you mean. The hamon is a result from several etches in vinegar and ferric. Rubbed with silicon carbide.

hope that what you see is just the whit hamon from that etch.

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The vinegar etch followed by silicon carbide rubbing (or pumice for a slightly cloudy look) gives that drastic white appearance. I think that is what struck you. Glad you like it. I heat treated these in my forge, because my shop isn't wired well enough to run my kiln. That means that I didn't get optimal control. In this case, I had them both too hot. The top one was especially too hot, which reduced the activity in the hamon.

 

I have lost some of my skills with just using a forge. I hope to get the shop wired this summer, and then the hamons will be back up to scratch.

 

thanks,

kc

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