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Finished Rebar blade blank


AndrewJohnKarow
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Well I've finally finished the Rebar blade I've been working on. I'm not exactly sure which design I when't with. If you can tell me what kind of blade I made please do. I just made what came naturally to me. (I haven't cleaned the oil off yet or sharpened)

finishedrebarblade.jpg

finishedrebarblade2.jpg

Edited by AndrewJohnKarow

Andrew Karow

 

Of the four elements, air, earth, water, and fire man stole only one from the gods. Fire. And with it, man forged his will upon the world."-anonymous

 

The Armorers accomplishing the knights, With busy hammers closing rivets up, Give dreadful note of preparation." -Shakespeare

 

“The pen may indeed be mightier than the sword, but the wordsmith would do well to welcome the blacksmith back into the fold, so that artisan craftsmanship the world over may fend off the ravages of industrialised homogeneity and bland monoculture.” -Alex Morritt
The blacksmith is the heart of the pack, and the blacksmith is the heart of the pack. - Me
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The question I always ask is, what do you think of it? Now that you've taken that thing that was in your head and made it manifest in the real world, what do you like, what do you wish you'd done differently? How does the object differ from the one you first saw?

 

Some times, not right now because my surgeon says I can't lift anything much more than a pound for several more months, I go out to the fire with nothing special in my head. I just need some time to mess in the fire. Without more direction than that, my default blade is a stick tang, flat back, with a hatchet nose about 4-7 inches long. I can make that blade pretty much without thinking.

 

If I want something else, a bowie, or a dagger, or a drop point, or something else, a drawing helps a lot. Or a picture (there is this thing called the Internet, it's full of pictures of knives, go figure).

 

Just letting the hammer fly is fun, but as they say, if you don't know where you're going, any road will do.

 

For me, I'm usually already thinking about final shape, handles and guards and everything else about the final product WHILE I'm forging. The reason for that is that there are spots in a blade that I know are going to give me trouble. If I can set them up early, they are much less hassle down the road.

 

On your project let me say this. First, it's rebar. You won't get much, if any hardness out of it, so at best it's a KSO. I wouldn't spend much more time on it. If you want to grind an edge on it, sure, why not? It won't cut very well no matter what you do. If you want to put a handle on it, go right ahead, I wouldn't, but it's your time.

 

I like the integral guard, I think you could do a better (read that as "more intentional") job, but I like the idea.

 

The pin holes don't line up very well, they look haphazard, like you didn't think before you drilled them.

 

The handle isn't very big, so the finished handle may be hard to hold onto.

 

If this were mine, I'd take from it what I could, nail this up one up on the wall as a reminder of where you started, and move onto the next one. As I have said elsewhere, don't use rebar for blades. Make tools out of it, like tongs. You'll learn a lot more about forging, making tongs, than you will making blades. If forging is what you want to learn, that is.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Ok thanks for the pointers. (I know rebar is crap. I haven't even cleaned it yet and I think I see a crack) With the integral guard I know I could have done better. I should have done that before I actually started on the blade. It was a pain to draw out to what it is because I had started the blade. I was able to add a twist to the guard though. I just made some mistakes in the order I did stuff.

Edited by AndrewJohnKarow

Andrew Karow

 

Of the four elements, air, earth, water, and fire man stole only one from the gods. Fire. And with it, man forged his will upon the world."-anonymous

 

The Armorers accomplishing the knights, With busy hammers closing rivets up, Give dreadful note of preparation." -Shakespeare

 

“The pen may indeed be mightier than the sword, but the wordsmith would do well to welcome the blacksmith back into the fold, so that artisan craftsmanship the world over may fend off the ravages of industrialised homogeneity and bland monoculture.” -Alex Morritt
The blacksmith is the heart of the pack, and the blacksmith is the heart of the pack. - Me
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I'm amazed the blade actually hardened with no cracks.

Edited by AndrewJohnKarow

Andrew Karow

 

Of the four elements, air, earth, water, and fire man stole only one from the gods. Fire. And with it, man forged his will upon the world."-anonymous

 

The Armorers accomplishing the knights, With busy hammers closing rivets up, Give dreadful note of preparation." -Shakespeare

 

“The pen may indeed be mightier than the sword, but the wordsmith would do well to welcome the blacksmith back into the fold, so that artisan craftsmanship the world over may fend off the ravages of industrialised homogeneity and bland monoculture.” -Alex Morritt
The blacksmith is the heart of the pack, and the blacksmith is the heart of the pack. - Me
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