Jump to content

Japanese sword fittings in shibuichi and silver (full set and many in progress pictures)


Recommended Posts

This is my First attempt at producing Japanese sword fittings or any sword fittings. Im really enjoying this and welcome any feedback to enrich my journey into a deeper understanding of the art.

 

the following photo was taken of the porous structure after breaking the shibuichi into manageable sizes

20160413_192213.jpg

 

following is some in progress of forming annealing and rolling

20160417_172453.jpg20160417_174523.jpg20160417_184032.jpg

 

the following is tsuba layout cutting and building an edge profile

20160422_173118.jpg20160430_171544.jpg20160509_195934.jpg

 

menuki plates pre forming

20160509_203319.jpg

 

cutting holes in kashira

20160509_220116.jpg

 

in progress as a whole

20160509_221019.jpg

 

the bench i work at in disarray

20160509_214146.jpg

 

layout of undercut pockets to be made for a cold connection inlay

20160510_211849.jpg20160512_171841.jpg20160513_094750.jpg20160513_095231.jpg

 

setting the silver inlay i also use fine punch to further secure the inlay and texture the surrounding area. making about 2 dozen a2 tool steel repousse tools was a little overkill because i ended up only using about 5

20160513_155552.jpg20160513_203242.jpg

 

 

this adjustable jig aids in cutting wire and tube at a set length over and over again, great tool very handy

20160518_190449.jpg

 

 

i switched to an engravers ball vice because its so versatile and a thermolock plastic due to my lack of expirience with red pitch witch led to more clean up than i wanted to put up with.

20160518_185528.jpg20160518_213155.jpg20160518_215300.jpg20160519_114943.jpg

 

 

these three photos show a bit more detail of the inlay process where i use a small chip of metal to further secure the silver inlay similar to what i know as a blind rivet.

20160519_231350.jpg20160519_234318.jpg20160519_233219.jpg

 

 

this next set is just a different technique than the last at better setting the inlay into place. this time a metal rod was inserted into the silver tube and both cut at the same time. both techniques have their own pros and cons, number 2 helps prevent tube distortion while number 1 has less clean up work just to name a few points

20160520_103217.jpg20160520_103640.jpg20160520_103819.jpg20160520_125748.jpg

 

sorry no pictures of patina in process but these are small so it went quick, just got them hot on a glass stovetop and dunked them into liver of sulfur.

 

the following photos are of completion ready for the customer.

20160523_191106.jpg20160523_191328.jpg20160523_191814.jpg

20160513_205143.jpg

20160519_125815.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work man, this makes me want to get a pitch bowl and get more in depth than I usually do on fittings.

I like the patina's contrast to the inlay- I also like the texturing.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think my brain just seized up.

Great tutorial. Thanks.

 

Haha, that happens to me too.

That is great work man! I think it turned out pretty damn nice, first go or not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

first go at Japanese fittings, but you obviously have a great deal of experience with jewelry or other non-ferrous work. That was awesome. Now, for the circular inlays, how exactly did you make the cavity? I need some detail to understand, please. Was it as simple as drilling a hole and then flattening the bottom with something like a tiny end mill or burr, and then undercutting?

 

How did you undercut?

 

What was the chip/blind rivet method?

 

Hope you don't mind the specific questions. I want to learn inlay some day.

 

kc

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice !!
​ Shibuichi is my favorite.

​ Thanks for sharing.

 

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...