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Just forged this beast up from a chunk of leaf spring, this photo is just after profile grinding. I kind of made this on a whim, I started with a drop point camp knife in mind but it just evolved into this. I do not currently have a plan for the level of polish, fittings or handle so I am up to your suggestions.

 

Thanks for the help all

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That is a great profile! I think that it would look good with a wood handle that is flared out at the end. I know traditional kukris can have bands around the handle that keep your hand locked in, so you don't really need a guard. The blade shape looks more modern, so maybe mix modern and traditional kukri elements?

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I'm thinking some sort of darker wood like walnut (or more exotic stuff) would look nice. If you want a super rugged camp knife look, you can use less pretty/cheaper (but still tough) wood and lacquer the handle. I have been getting into lacquering recently, and I really like the grippy feel of my machete handle with embedded forge scale. The process is pretty much the same thing as when you were in kindergarten art class: you make a pattern with glue and then sprinkle on fine powder/glitter, and dump the rest off of the paper. If you want to get creative with it, you can use different materials, colors, etc. to make a patterned texture on the handle. It has proven to be some pretty tough stuff so far, I am using regular modern brushing lacquer.

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Ok, I needed to switch to hand filling for the remainder of the beveling process(lucky I forged them in). I also forged a guard from a wrought iron rail road spike, the long front tine will be bent down to protect the index and middle fingers from whatever the user chooses to cut. The red line is the current center of balance without a handle, should I flute the guard to try and move it more the point?

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That's coming along nicely. Where do you want the balance to be?

I have a traditional full tang kukri, and the balance is just at start of the forward curve; 3 or so inches from the front of the handle scales.

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You could drill some holes in the tang to lighten it up. You could flute the guard as you suggested or thin the long branch out as well. You may have a bitch of a time moving it forward though since you will be mostly adding material on the handle and not removing anymore on the blade.

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The only way to move the balance point forward is to add more weight to the blade, kinda difficult at this point.

Especially because you are going to ad more weight to the handle area which will move the BP backward.

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Depending on who the 4X36 really belongs to there is a modification that will let you grind the plunge lines a little easier. You can get get some ceramic platen material at someplace like High Temperature Tools and Refractory or maybe USA Knifemaker Supply or maybe just a piece of stone tile cut to shape and affix it to the existing platen with some JB Weld. Also put a couple of sheet metal screws below the new platen just in case the JB Weld lets loose. You don't want the new platen material to extend beyond the belts and you may even want the belts of overhang the edge just a smidge. This will give you room to grind in your plunge lines better. A gun smith told me about this modification. He liked making knives but couldn't justify getting a 2X72" grinder just to turn out a couple or so knives a year.

 

Doug

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Depending on who the 4X36 really belongs to there is a modification that will let you grind the plunge lines a little easier. You can get get some ceramic platen material at someplace like High Temperature Tools and Refractory or maybe USA Knifemaker Supply or maybe just a piece of stone tile cut to shape and affix it to the existing platen with some JB Weld. Also put a couple of sheet metal screws below the new platen just in case the JB Weld lets loose. You don't want the new platen material to extend beyond the belts and you may even want the belts of overhang the edge just a smidge. This will give you room to grind in your plunge lines better. A gun smith told me about this modification. He liked making knives but couldn't justify getting a 2X72" grinder just to turn out a couple or so knives a year.

 

Doug

My problem isn't the crispness of the plunge line, I can fix that by other means, my problem was that with a forward curved blade I could not lay it flat across the 4 inch platen, but I have worked around the problem and in the end I retired a file that I can now use as blade steel
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