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4-Bar Core Viking Sword


Ben A.

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In addition to several obvious talents, you, sir, are a fine forge-welder.

 

You also have excellent taste in banjo pickers.

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Don: Thanks for the kind words. Yeah, my wife is leaning to pick the banjo, and there's no better beginning book than Ole Earl!

Connor: I started in early February, and I finished the sword June 8th. I'm just slow with the posting. There are a lot of pictures to go through!

-Ben

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I feel a little bit better then =D I started a pattern welded viking sword a year ago and I've yet to put the handle on the finished blade >_< I thought you were being a total wizard and getting it done in like 2 days =D

---

Justin "Tharkis" Mercier

www.tharkis.com

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I know there have been several discussions on tip welding techniques, but I'd like to hear how you did yours. It sounds like you hammered the tip down into a swage block of some sort. can you tell us more?

-Brian

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Brian,

My swage block is shown below. I found the depression on the outer rim that matched the tip curve best (looking for it to be just a hair tight). I think it was the second curve up, from the bottom left hand side in th picture. I stood the block on edge, on the floor, so I could hammer the sword down into the depression. I did one weld heat straight down, brushed, fluxed, then the next weld heat, I hit while rocking the sword in the slicing plane, back and forth. The next weld heat was at the anvil, starting with upsetting blows, and coming back toward the tang, flipping often to keep everything equal from one side to the other. then I worked my way slowly all the way back to the tang, with a lot of fluxing, cleaning, and heating. I hope that makes sense, feel free to ask for clarification on anything I might have explained too quickly.

SwageblockSmaller.jpg

Edited by Ben A.
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Here are the roughed in wrought iron hilt pieces on the quenched and tempered sword blade. The string wrapped handle is just temporary, so I can hold the sword and do some test swinging. It will eventually be replaced with a leather wrapped wood core handle. The blade needs lots of finishing work, and more etching but, for now, I'm going to move on to the hilt parts.

IMG_5144smaller.jpg

Edited by Ben A.
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Here are the first twisted wires being inlaid in the grooves. This is the first time I have done this, so I learned as I went. The thing I messed up here is the alignment of the twists. If you look closely at wires 6&7, and 8&9 from the left, you'll notice that the chevrons aren't exactly lined up. Seems a small thing here, but it shows up pretty starkly later...

IMG_5204.JPG

Edited by Ben A.
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Here's the first side fully inlaid, and planished to make the overlay, and the pommel shaped and fitted (you can see some horizontal black lines from the slag inclusions in the wrought iron). About the middle of the upper guard, you can see where two of the wires didn't match up very well. It's more noticeable than I thought it would be. Lesson learned.

IMG_5205.JPG

Edited by Ben A.
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Now I want to make a sword too! :lol:

 

I will restrain myself - and go for a long seax instead...

 

Keep it up! Very informative to see your work method as well! Excellent! ;)

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Thank you all for your kind words!

Alan: Yes, I tried to shortcut it but found that, if you don't undercut the groove, the wire just pops out. I think this is especially true when your wire does not fully fill the groove (there has to be enough left to spread on the surface for the overlay). I use a square graver for the channels,then a knife graver for the undercuts (although I think an onglette would work, and last longer between sharpenings).

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Here's a view of the inlay being set into the pommel. I quickly learned that you have to start on one edge, then hammer the wires all the way over to the other side. If you set both sides and work to the middle, the wire stretches, and pops out of the middle!

IMG_5275.JPG

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Holy Jamole! I stay away from the forum for a couple of days and this happens.

Great work Ben. I am lovin' this build.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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damn, this is one fine effort. thanks for sharing so much about the pommel, guard, etc.

 

I am so intimidated by this sort of carving/engraving. What sort of graver/chisel are you using?

 

really sweet stuff!

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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