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Wahoo, forging away on the new anvil


Nick Wheeler

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Well, I'm in love with this thing.... 450 lb. is a lot of anvil, and this one's a keeper :D

 

Since this is "hot work" I figured I'd inundate you with some more shameless pics of me working in the hot shop B)

 

Hopefully when this project is done the collectors will be able to put all the 1000's of pics together I'll be sending them into some sort of thread... but here's a few just for fun :)

 

-Nick-

FP32.jpg

FP35.jpg

FP25.jpg

FP17.jpg

FP29.jpg

FP23.jpg

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You'll have to take pics when you make my Mediteranean Bowie... :)

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Thanks guys :D

 

The steel I'm using is Timken Latrobe W1... I get it in 12' bars... I have 5/8" and 1" round, this is 1"

 

It's a shame it comes so nicely turned and finished, I just ugly it up in the forge ;)

 

The slide show Don put together about completing a bowie is one of the coolest things on the internet (IMHO) so being able to do the junior version is lots of fun.

 

Thanks for look'n guys! :)

-Nick-

 

http://www.wheelerknives.com

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I am completely green over that anvil! :notworthy: And that power hammer ... shweeeeet! I'll be looking for the finished product of that blade on "Show and Tell" here soon. Looks awesome.

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I'm fortunate to have a lot of nice equipment... but then again it's been a long road getting it all. I started buying tools for my shop at 18, and I'm 27 now.... so they didn't all show up overnight ;)

 

Thanks Matt, actually the tool in the first pic is a Jeff Carlisle hydraulic press. It runs at 1" per second (travel) opposed to a power hammer that moves very very fast but with much less downward pressure. With the right dies, and quick, precise movement, you can move metal VERY fast on one of these. I changed it a bit, so it doesn't look exactly like it did when I got it, but not much different.

 

Thanks :)

-Nick-

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Hey Nick, what's the radius on those drawing dies? I may just have to start collecting parts for my press again!!

Guy Thomas

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Thanks Lin! :)

 

Guy, I actually ground these down from rectangular bar :banghead: With a fairly new 50X ceramic it didn't take too long actually. But my lateral drawing dies are nearly the same size, and I made them by slicing a piece of round-stock in half lengthwise.

 

The round for the lateral dies was 2" round. I'd say I'm somewhere around 2.5- 3" diam. on the drawing dies.

 

Here's the two for comparison.

drawingdie.jpg

drawingdie2.jpg

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Hey Dan-

 

If I had access to a bunch of free or cheap 4140, I'd probably use that. But all of my dies are mild steel (except for the two I made from RR rail) :D

 

The mild steel holds up pretty well, unless you get a wild hair and start pressing cold stuff. I had a bolt I needed flattened once. I knew it would go cold under the press... unfortunately, I had the bolt threads DEEPLY imprinted on my dies after that. Also, I momentarily forgot about that incident, and straighted a rebar handle that had gotten pretty cold. I then had that cool rebar pattern in my dies.

 

The indentations were bad enough I had to just remake the dies. It was faster than grinding out the divots and getting the dies flat again.

 

-Nick-

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Thanks Nick, that's also a dang good idea, having two sets of dies on each die insert for that press. Not only are they quick change, but you may not have to change dies at all depending on what you are doing!

Guy Thomas

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Thanks Guy-

 

Some folks get really anal about keeping the hot metal directly under the ram at all times, saying you'll get an unever billet if you don't.

 

But I've found no deflection problems with this press. I do try to stay more in the center of the dies (as much as I can) but I have no problems.

 

Almost all of my dies are combination dies now. It's just so much easier to draw something, and then be able to slide it right over and make sure it's flat all in the same heat, without switching out dies.

 

:)

 

-Nick-

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