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Wrought Iron?


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I would like to aquire some WI for myself to work with, but it's getting hard to find, and I would rather buy from one of you than a big business. Is there anyone among you who si willing to part with a small amount of wrought iron? 10lbs is about the most I would like to buy right now, so it doesn't have to be a whole lot, and quality doesn't matter too much either, it's going to be for fittings and guards and such. Thanks!

 

Tim

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It is fun stuff to work with glad you had so many people respond. Remember work it hotter than steel or mild and work from the middle not the end to avoid splitting takes a bit to get used to doing that but saves a bunch of issues. Chris

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I would like to aquire some WI for myself to work with, but it's getting hard to find, and I would rather buy from one of you than a big business. Is there anyone among you who si willing to part with a small amount of wrought iron? 10lbs is about the most I would like to buy right now, so it doesn't have to be a whole lot, and quality doesn't matter too much either, it's going to be for fittings and guards and such. Thanks!

 

Tim

 

Tim, Be aware that a lot of the stuff folks think are wrought iron are not truly wrought iron. Here is a reference and while Wikipedia is not always 100% true they are pretty close on this one.

 

The following are exerts/quotes from that piece: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrought_iron

 

The demand for wrought iron reached its peak in the 1860s with the adaptation of ironclad warships and railways. However, as properties such as brittleness of mild steel improved, it became less costly and more widely available than wrought iron, whose usage then declined.

 

Steel began to replace iron for railroad rails as soon as the Bessemer process for making steel was adopted (1865 on). Iron remained dominant for structural applications until the 1880s, because of problems with brittle steel, caused by introduced nitrogen, high carbon, excess phosphorus or excessive temperature during rolling, or too-rapid rolling.[38] By 1890 steel had largely replaced iron for structural applications.

 

Sheet iron (Armco 99.97% pure iron) had good properties for use in appliances, including being well-suited for enamelling and welding, and being rust-resistant.[39]

In the 1960s, the price of steel production was dropping due to recycling, and even using the Aston process, wrought iron production was a labor-intensive process. It has been estimated that the production of wrought iron costs approximately twice as much as the production of low-carbon steel.[3] In the United States the last plant closed in 1969.[3] The last in Great Britain (and the world) was the Atlas Forge of Thomas Walmsley and Sons in Bolton, which closed in 1973. Its equipment, of a type dating from the 1860s, was moved to the Blists Hill site of Ironbridge Gorge Museum for preservation.[40] Some wrought iron is still being produced for heritage restoration purposes, but only by recycling scrap.

When someone tells you they have wrought iron you need to ask the source of the iron. Some think that all wagon wheels is wrought iron. Not so as time progressed they got further and further away from using wrought iron.

True wrought iron has a distinct look to it. Once sawn half in two bend it over, and you will see what I mean!

My photobucket is not working again so I am going to link a search to this post!

https://www.google.com/search?q=breaking+wrought+iron&tbm=isch&imgil=1beKyTYmLi1GdM%253A%253BVdrPaMF7WwkBwM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.bladesmithsforum.com%25252Findex.php%25253Fshowtopic%2525253D9936&source=iu&pf=m&fir=1beKyTYmLi1GdM%253A%252CVdrPaMF7WwkBwM%252C_&usg=___0ESvf5pz5gwn4yqgMcPN46XqmQ%3D&biw=1280&bih=923&ved=0ahUKEwjw9cCqgufNAhVPxCYKHb4zATQQyjcITw&ei=T0OBV7CSEM-ImwG-54SgAw#imgrc=aykwfTTEjZvjCM%3A

Notice picture 1 and 3 and a few others on that page and that is what true wrought looks like inside! Good luck and hope you can score some real wrought iron!!

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Not to hijack a thread, but I'd love to pick some wrought up myself.

Some shows up here every once in a while, but you have to be quick to score it.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

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