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A few questions


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Hello.

My name is Archie Zietman, I am a 15 year old knife enthusiast from Massachusetts. I ham almost done setting up a new charcoal forge in my back yard (my old one died) I made a small knife out of a file, which I lost somewhere in my basement, (I'll see whether I can find it) The trouble is, I am unsure what knife I should christen my new forge with. Any sugestions? Also, which do poeple prefer, a side blast forge or a bottom blast?

Thanks,

Archie Zietman

Edited by Archie Zietman
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Hey, join the club. I'm sixteen, and I've caught the bladesmithing bug too. If you can, get a group of buddies together and have some fun with it. That's what we did, and we all work together to keep the forge running and take turns hammering and so forth, and while we're waiting for the peices to heat up, we have at it with our practice swords made of rebar. Personally, I prefer a sideblast forge, but I'm by no means an expert or anything.

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Archie,

 

A GREAT $15.00 investment; Wayne Goddard's $50 Dollar Knife Shop. For someone just getting started, you will love it! :D It not only shows you that you don't need a 2 thousand dollar KMG grinder and bunch of fancy equipment to make really nice knives but also has a few sketches for a forge design. Good luck, have fun, be safe, and keep the forge fires burning. Rock on! :ylsuper: (I just wanted to use that smiley face)

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Thanks a lot for your replies! I am mostly interested in armour, would it be okay if I posted pictures of those projects too? it's hot work anyways :D I dunno whther my parents would agree to letting me buy yet another book. I've blown all my money on the complete bladesmith, Techniques of Medieval Armour Reproduction of the 14th Century, and cement, angle iron, goggles and ear protection. :D

Here's a paint job of my new forge:

forgedesignyetagain.JPG

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I am mostly interested in armour, would it be okay if I posted pictures of those projects too?

 

Please do.

I'd like to see what you come up with.

 

Here's a tip that won't break the bank account. Get yourself several pieces of hardwood log. Doesn't matter if its dry. You can carve out indentations in the endgrain and use that for dishing out shapes during synclastic and anticlastic raising.

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I like all of it. Right now, I have just finished cutting out the blank for a 14th century raised bascinet. I am very much in favor of historical armour and techniques, especially hot raising-VIVE LA HOT RAISING!!!! WOOHOO!!!! Gonna put all the bits of my forge together tommorow and start raising. The only dishing I do is to coax the metal in the direction I want it to go before raising. Like the methods that are illustrated here:

http://www.anvilfire.com/21centbs/armor/No...t/top_index.htm

and also, if you come across a certain "Matthew Cross" connected to "Blankenshield Armory" or just "Blankenshield Armory" Disregard everything they say. I'm not gonna go into a rant right now, but just give the word and I'll tell you exactly why I say to disregard everything they say. :D

Happy metal pounding,

Archie

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Yes. It requires the utmost patience, and I am not the most patient person. endless linking and riveting together of tiny links is not my idea of fun. GIVE ME PLATE STEEL!!!!!! butted maille sucks, IMHO the only way to make decent protective maille is riveted, butted just pulls apart.

Edited by Archie Zietman
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