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Hello again everyone. I went ahead and got the refractory cement that was rated at 3000F for $5. I brushed, dabbed, and smoothed out my first coat. It is curing in the oven right now at 500F. I'm going to see what an hour does to it. I moistened the ceramic insulation first before I applied the cement. I read this is benefitial to help keep the fibers down and let the cement make a better connection. I will check on the forge in an hour and see if it will handle a second coat yet. Is it best to shut off the oven and let the cement cool down inside the oven gradually? I don't want to pull it out and ruin the process.

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Most people just let it dry in the shop for a few days, then fire the forge for a few minutes every so often until it's fully cured, but whatever works!

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I'm not certain the method I'm trying works. I just wanted to see if it would because I definitely want a couple coats of this stuff. It's thinning out really well. I do not have my regulator yet and have not filled up my tank. So I figured I'd try this out. It went on very even and didn't crack when it hardened. I'm doing the second coat here after it cools down

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Im getting to the same point you are Karl.

 

Are there any detriments/benefits to going with straight cement? I had been planning on doing brick/cement combination but if there are reasons against it, Im all ears!

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Two different forge types, Tom. Ordinary brick and cement tend to either crumble or explode in a gas forge. They aren't that happy in solid fuel either. For your forge I'd mix up some adobe out of cheap kitty litter, ash, and a little straw. That's the standard mix for a Lively-style forge, with sand optional.

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Two different forge types, Tom. Ordinary brick and cement tend to either crumble or explode in a gas forge. They aren't that happy in solid fuel either. For your forge I'd mix up some adobe out of cheap kitty litter, ash, and a little straw. That's the standard mix for a Lively-style forge, with sand optional.

 

Youre like some kind of forge-born angel

 

EDIT: I just saw that he was talking about gas stuff. Thats what I get for skimming.

Edited by Tom White
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My second coat smoothed out the rest of my dips. It is curing in the oven as I type. I am not sure about using typical cement. This refractory cement I'm using is super fine and sandy. It looks more like a thin set than a cement. It is hardening very firm and with a high grit sandpaper like texture. From what I have read, the key is getting as much moisture out of the cement before using the forge at typical temps. If not, the moisture left uncured can cause the cement to explode as Alan said. This is what I have read though. I have 0 experience. This is my first forge experience. After my 3rd coat I will let the forge set in the garage for 2 days or so. I am curing each cost at 500*F for an hour and letting it cool down in the oven.

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What is the brand of refractory cement you're using? Personally, I would give the cement at least a week to dry out, especially with the humid weather we've been having here in the Midwest.

 

Doug

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Meeco's red devil I believe. I got the kind that did not have the fibers in the mix because I figured it wouldn't brush on as well. It's firmed up well. I have three coats brushed on. I'm debating if I want to add more.

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I fired up the forge for the first time. I think I let the fire go too long because I did get some cracking and a few flakes. No exposed kaowool though. I think I will let it cure even longer since I still have a few dark grey spots in the forge around the edges of the rim. I did notice my flame had a green hue to it. Is this bad?

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How long did you fire it for? Cracking is not unusual though. The material shrinks to some degree. Patch the cracks and let it dry and then fire again. Keep doing that until its dry and no more cracks appear. Mind you, your lining will require repair as time passes, and eventually will need to be replaced.

Its possible that your torch is burning off something in the mortar and turning the flame green.

Edited by Wes Detrick
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I used satanite refractory on my propane forge that was lined with insawool. I let my initial coating dry for 2 days with a shop fan blowing on it. Kinda seemed to stay grey although it was firm and dry to the touch. Then I fired for a couple minutes and allowed it to cool for 2-3 hours then repeated 3 more times. After firing it the color changed to more of a white sand and hard. I had several cracks and uneven spots. After 2 more thinner coats repeating the same process I'm very pleased with my results. Very uniform and no cracking.

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Alright I will do the new coats with firings after each one. After some reading, it seems that I may have the choke adjustment off. A few people mentioned too much propane and not enough air can result in the color I had in my flame. I opened the choke some more and it's all blue

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