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Wes Detrick

More than one way to skin a cat

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I thought this might interest a few.

 

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This guy is a super genius.
I've watched the video of him building the house behind him.
It is amazing.
He builds a kiln essentially for firing roof tiles.
Love the forge/furnace.
It seems we've missed something in the video.
Where was Ore added to the furnace or was it in the crucible he made?

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The moment I watched this, my first thought was to see if this was on the forum yet. I'm not surprised! That is the most primitive champion blower I've ever seen! And I think that the ore was mixed with some other materials to form a puck which he placed in the center. I don't know if it was a crucible, or just a suspension of iron ore and clay to keep it all in one place.

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From the description " Then I collected orange iron bacteria from the creek (iron oxide), mixed it with charcoal powder (carbon to reduce oxide to metal) and wood ash (flux to lower the meting point) and formed it into a cylindrical brick. I filled the furnace with charcoal, put the ore brick in and commenced firing. The ore brick melted and produced slag with tiny, 1mm sized specs of iron through it. My intent was not so much to make iron but to show that the furnace can reach a fairly high temperature using this blower. A taller furnace called a bloomery was generally used in ancient times to produce usable quantities of iron and consumed more charcoal, ore and labour.
This device produces a blast of air with each stroke of the bow regardless of whether it is pushed or pulled. The bow makes it possible to operate the blower without using a complicated belt and wheel assembly used in traditional forge blowers. There is a brief pause at the end of each stroke where the fan stops to rotate in the other direction, but this is effectively no different to the intermittent blast of a double acting bellows of Europe or box bellows of Asia. The materials used (wood, bark, bark fibre and clay) are readily available on most continents. No leather, valves or precisely fitted piston gaskets are required as with other types of bellows. The cords for this device wear out often so a number of back up cords should be kept handy for quick replacement. In summary, this is an easy to make device that solves the problem of supplying forced combustion air required for high temperature furnaces and forges."

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First thing that comes to mind, "where there is a will, there is a way"! We think that we got it tough when we pick up the phone, or fire up the computer and find out are favorite supplier doesn't have what we need! This guy just goes to nature, and she provides!!

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I love this so much. I think I may build one of those bellows to run my next moonlight hearth remelt!

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I love this so much. I think I may build one of those bellows to run my next moonlight hearth remelt!

 

Please please please film it if you do!

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So much for excuses!!!!

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I just love this...

Now I need to find some river clay :(

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And I have a blacksmith friend who says I'm crazy for wanting to build a brake drum forge from stuff I scrounged. I think I'll just build it and not tell him.

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