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Yakut knife


Jacek Robotka

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Hello,
Please recently made Yakut knife.
Hand forged blade, handle made from burl with bone bolster. Sheath made from birch bark with wooden core and brass fittings. Total length 260mm, blade length 145mm. :)

Thanks

Jacek

 

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Edited by Jacek Robotka
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Cool! I especially like the sheath. How easy was it to wrap around the birch bark?

 

Thank you.

 

I shaped the birch bark after soaking in hot water for 5 min, without that process it wouldnt be so easy to shape it :)

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Interesting design--concave on one side and convex on the other? I haven't seen a single-edged blade like that, before, that I can recall.

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Interesting design--concave on one side and convex on the other? I haven't seen a single-edged blade like that, before, that I can recall.

Its traditional knife used by Yakuts. This is everyday knife and its mainly used for short and precise cutting and whittling. ;)

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The knife is wonderful but it is the sheath that draws me... is this a traditional style?

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George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
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Jacek,a very fine rendition of this interesting style.I think that you did great interpreting those proportions.

 

George,i don't want to butt in on someone else's thread,but i have been studying these knives for a while,and am i touch with a couple of makers that follow this interesting old tradition.

 

Here's a link to an older,utilitarian example of the birchbark sheaf:http://rusknife.com/topic/10279-%D1%8F%D0%BA%D1%83%D1%82%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9-%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%B6/page-3,

post # 88

Birchbark is not used all that very commonly,but it's not a rarity,either.The intent with this style of a sheaf is to have it made of a "warm" material,one not likely to rob your bare hand of much heat,on a cold day.The top end of the handle fits into the sheaf tightly,to keep it from falling out,and the forest junk from falling into the sheaf.

The part surrounding the blade is the opposite,the blade hanging in there without touching,so upon holstering the knife with blood and fat on it it won't freeze in there(a real possibility in cold climate).

The sheaf is commonly opened at the end,to be able to get rid of whatever did get i there,somehow.

So,most commonly,they were made of wood,either two halves joined by seizing with fiber or rawhide,or most commonly one-piece,carved by the very knife that it was being made for.

A very practical,utilitarian,hunter's tool,yet,considering the importance of hunting in Saha culture,something that was often made in an elaborate,"status" grade,(such as that wonderful version of Jacek's).

 

Sorry again to ramble here...

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God is in his heaven,and Czar is far away...

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http://pin.it/fdoFaqi

 

I hope that link works. These are Slavic knives from the 11th century... the sheaths are so similar that I was hoping this might be an unbroken tradition, though I don't know if these were made of birch-bark. The fittings, and the overall pattern however... the resemblance is amazing.

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George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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Hm...George,i wish that i knew more about the inter-relatedness of all these different traditions....(thanks for the link,those sheaves are neat).

 

Saha(Yakut) are an old culture,an amalgamation of the people moving north out of the Greater Mongolia with the tribes that they encountered along the way....Their metalwork goes back possibly to those geographical regions,as for the longest time they were the only ones working the iron,and the influence of their styles is visible among the work of craftsmen of the neighboring tribes.

(In their present area,the valley of the Lena river,practically from the border with China to the Arctic ocean).

 

Theoretically,they first encountered anyone who could be,however remotely,be described as "slavic" only i the 1500's,when subjugated by the russians....(as most migrations have taken place in the opposite direction,east to west).

 

The unique specifics of their knife-making had mainly to do with the blade-section geometry,the middle of the 5 diagrams on the last photo.

(the other photos are of some older known Saha knives,again,pictured are the "status"-grade objects).

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post-4215-0-01643900-1365144489_thumb.jpg

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God is in his heaven,and Czar is far away...

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Thanks for the information Jake, it looks like any connection is coincidence.

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George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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Thanks for the information Jake, it looks like any connection is coincidence.

 

 

Hm...George,i wish that i knew more about the inter-relatedness of all these different traditions....(thanks for the link,those sheaves are neat).

 

Saha(Yakut) are an old culture,an amalgamation of the people moving north out of the Greater Mongolia with the tribes that they encountered along the way....Their metalwork goes back possibly to those geographical regions,as for the longest time they were the only ones working the iron,and the influence of their styles is visible among the work of craftsmen of the neighboring tribes.

(In their present area,the valley of the Lena river,practically from the border with China to the Arctic ocean).

 

Theoretically,they first encountered anyone who could be,however remotely,be described as "slavic" only i the 1500's,when subjugated by the russians....(as most migrations have taken place in the opposite direction,east to west).

 

The unique specifics of their knife-making had mainly to do with the blade-section geometry,the middle of the 5 diagrams on the last photo.

(the other photos are of some older known Saha knives,again,pictured are the "status"-grade objects).

 

 

http://pin.it/fdoFaqi

 

I hope that link works. These are Slavic knives from the 11th century... the sheaths are so similar that I was hoping this might be an unbroken tradition, though I don't know if these were made of birch-bark. The fittings, and the overall pattern however... the resemblance is amazing.

 

 

Thank you George na Jake for lots of information ;)

Btw I do a lot of Slavic sheaths therefore there is a possibility that some of the influences could sneaked out when I was making the sheath :D

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Ah,so maybe THAT's where i've seen these characteristic sheathes before!:)...Jacek,thanks,your work is outstanding,very well informed and thoughtful,and flawlessly executed.

 

George,i can only wish that i knew more about the different historic/regional styles,AND had more of an analytical capacity...If i may suggest a direction in research,it'd be to look into the Ugric people's art and metalwork...It's often overlooked that the Ugrs have migrated from Western Siberia,and upon their crossig the Urals have split into the Northern and the Southern parts,directions.

The Northern ones have gone on to become many Ugric tribes of Finland,Karelia,Marii El,and further East along the Asian coast;and the Southern Ugric people have gone to some surprising places,the valley of the Danube,i believe being one of them,Hungary,and some other locations where their contact with the Slavic tribes would have been inevitable...(all the above is very crude picture,sorry,that's about all i know of the matter...)

 

Jacek,one last time-apologies for this speculative ramblings in your post....

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God is in his heaven,and Czar is far away...

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Ah,so maybe THAT's where i've seen these characteristic sheathes before! :)...Jacek,thanks,your work is outstanding,very well informed and thoughtful,and flawlessly executed.

 

George,i can only wish that i knew more about the different historic/regional styles,AND had more of an analytical capacity...If i may suggest a direction in research,it'd be to look into the Ugric people's art and metalwork...It's often overlooked that the Ugrs have migrated from Western Siberia,and upon their crossig the Urals have split into the Northern and the Southern parts,directions.

The Northern ones have gone on to become many Ugric tribes of Finland,Karelia,Marii El,and further East along the Asian coast;and the Southern Ugric people have gone to some surprising places,the valley of the Danube,i believe being one of them,Hungary,and some other locations where their contact with the Slavic tribes would have been inevitable...(all the above is very crude picture,sorry,that's about all i know of the matter...)

 

Jacek,one last time-apologies for this speculative ramblings in your post....

Dont worry, it was interesting to find out more about these types of knives ;)

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