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Hunk o'steel


Joshua States

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At the ABANA conference last month, there were folks selling all kinds of stuff. Tools, equipment, finished pieces, doo-dads, everything you could imagine (if it had something to do with metalwork) was somewhere for sale.

So what did I buy? A hunk of steel. W-2 steel to be specific.

This measures about 2" x 2" x 14" and weighs 20.2 pounds.

 

Hunk of W-2.JPG

Hunk of W-2 (2).JPG

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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Joshua ,

 

That is interesting..it looks like an ingot...I am curious if it is solid or gassy..do you know anything about the source.

 

Jan

Yes, it is an ingot, and it is very solid. The source is one of the most interesting bladesmiths I know, Ray Rybar.

Ray is known for his ability to weave pictures and Biblical verses into his Damascus.

Ray used to work in the steel mill industry a long time ago in Pennsylvania. When the mill he was working at closed its doors and everyone was taking tools and equipment, Ray went up to the offices and emptied the filing cabinets of all the steel recipes and formulae. Ray has become disgruntled with what passes for modern W-2 and 1095 steels because they simply do not perform the way he remembers from back in the old days. He has access to a testing lab and the optical emission spectrometry equipment, necessary to determine the elemental composition. The steels we are buying from typical source retailers, vary so much between runs that it's almost impossible to get consistent quality and product.

Recently, Ray has taken these old recipes and run limited production quantities of 1095 and W-2. He has given the target data and the acceptable tolerances to the mill. When the production run is complete, he sends a few random ingots out for spectral analysis. The mill is producing what Ray wants and he is selling some of what he has produced. This 20 pound block cost me $250. Well worth the money I think.

 

 

Sweet, got a project in mind?

Lots of ideas. This is a huge chunk of steel. First things first, I have to forge it down into usable shapes. I'm going out to Hancock's shop later this month and we are going to turn it into some bar stock. I'm thinking a W-2 Rapier might be in my future...........you know, something with a groovy Hamon running down the center. Probably start out with a nice Seax though.....

Edited by Joshua States

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Thanks Joshua

...I would talk to Ray prior to forging that bar (ingot)..he may have some hints as to how to start. I have a blade blank forged in the hamon thread which is probably close in composition to what you have there. I think Ray is onto something but the top of your ingot looks like it was poured when the metal was getting quite cool...does that matter..I don't know.

Jan

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I would cut that into smaller pieces and forge with the handle welded to the ugly top.

Once you cut a section off you can see the condition of the solidification and better judge the ingot.

It appears like the top 30% will be an issue.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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Wow 25$ a pound for something you can't really do much with, most paid for a doorstop ever.

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Um, Sam.....$250 divided by 20.2 lbs = $12.38 per pound. Just sayin' do the math.

OK all you naysayers, check it out.

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=32964&&p=331319&page=12

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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  • 5 years later...

Time for a little thread necromancy. Life has been really hectic lately and there hasn't been much shop time other than this complex commission I've been working on. Work has been rediculously crazy and I needed some forge therapy. So, I grabbed a hunk of this and went to town.

 

The starting hunk.

1 Starting block.jpg

 

This has asome voids and pockets that need to be closed up with forge welding. 

It gets drawn out into a bar about 1 inch thick and 1.5 inches wide.

 

2 First draw.jpg

 

This I hot cut and fold in three.

 

3 first stack.jpg

 

Weld, draw out and normalize. Then cut into 4 pieces, stack and repeat.

 

4 Second stack.jpg

 

The resultant bar gets folded once more for good measure (3 times is the charm here) and the final bar measures about 7" by 3/4" by 1.5"

 

5 final bar.jpg

 

  • Like 4

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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