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Broken Sword Help.


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I recently posted photos of a sword that has two different pattern-welded sides. It's very long with a blade length of about 36in. Well, after quenching, one of the edge bars separated close to the hilt for roughly 2.5in. I tried soldering it today but that did not work. I don't really want to cut is down and the pattern is beautiful.

 

Any thoughts from folks here on other ways to repair or how to approach this? I am probably close to 50 hours with this sword.

 

Niels.

 

 

IMG-20160813-WA0008.jpg

IMG-20160813-WA0010.jpg

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I can't see the Delam.
Can you post a pic where it is pointed out?
Can you forge weld it again?
There is a method Alan posted a while back about mixing sugar and flux together to lower the delam temp on thin stock for rewelds.

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If you're not going to sell it, you could just leave it there. I can see it, but it isn't that bad. It wouldn't be very noticeable after the etch, there isn't an issue with performance, and that's what was done historically.

Other than that, you'd have to start chopping away at the blade. How long is it?

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I had something pretty similar happen on a sword I was very happy with a few months back. The steel edge ripped away from the core about 1mm for about 3 inches during the quench. I tried inlaying silver and then gold into it, with no luck. I thought about heat treating again. I thought about chopping the blade and ending up with a blade of about 27 inches. I ended up leaving it as is. The blade as it exists now is fully functional and beautiful.

 

I thought about what I could do to fix it. Even thought about forge welding it back together and then grinding the edge back a bit.

 

Ultimately I left it as is, as an 'almost there' sort of piece. I've never seen any period originals without weld flaws in and around the cores or edges, which doesn't make it suck less, but I'm happy to take it as a learning experience and keep on. That's what I would do, finish it and keep it for yourself, and see what happens next time. Sorry to hear about the delam Niels!

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TIG weld? If you found a good TIG welder those guys are pretty amazing, and it fills with no pits/bubbles if done right. Won't etch out the same color as the two carbon steels.

 

You'd have to redo the HT, of course.

 

Dave

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TIG weld? If you found a good TIG welder those guys are pretty amazing, and it fills with no pits/bubbles if done right. Won't etch out the same color as the two carbon steels.

 

You'd have to redo the HT, of course.

 

Dave

That got me to thinking about a friend of mine who is a jeweler.

They use a tiny tig machine that has such localized heat it would never ruin the heat treat..

Good Idea Dave.

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That got me to thinking about a friend of mine who is a jeweler.

They use a tiny tig machine that has such localized heat it would never ruin the heat treat..

Good Idea Dave.

And since TIG uses a filler rod, you could use a strip of the edge steel as filler...

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I have tried it all, tig, hammered filler material , iron powder and borax none of it really works at this stage and all show smudging. its a nice blade...but it will never be flaw free unless you remove the flaw and associated material. I have a sword blade I put a hundred hours into , delam only became aparent after final finishing it did not show on straightening.

not as nice as this blade but the best I had made at the time.

I still have it ,its a great show and tell and got some cool photos of it and it helped to sell a few swords.

 

you just have to move on.....and do it again ...better!

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The only 2 'historic' methods that I know would both involve re-heat treating. There are a few blades that have been seen with basically an S of steel welded over the face of the blade over a flaw. (in fact, it's thought that the long 'serpent' of untwisted non patterned rod on the tip of the vhema sword may be just such a 'repair'

 

The other method was used to repair bad welds in axe heads, which is to copper braze it together, i dont know that it's ever been seen on a sword, but it would work. I've done this with an axe and an old penny and it actually works surprisingly well.

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The serpent on the Vehmaa sword isn't a repair job, though there are flaws in the serpent itself and around it and on other parts of the blade. The way it's built would mean you would have to know it had a flaw before you ever started assembling the bars if the serpent was meant to fix anything.

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26" for the blade is a little short, but a 26" blade with no flaws is still your best route in my honest opinion. Nothing in life is impossible, but I have found that often times attempting tasks out of desperation leads to wasted time and passion that could be applied in a more fruitful fashion. That being said, if I was being stubborn and not listening to my own advice, I would clean out the delamination, since solder was attempted this will be more difficult, I would look at abrasive blasting, followed by an acid soak, followed by removing oxides best you can. Mix some boric acid with your borax, bring the area in question to slightly hotter than welding temperature and try to pinch the edge back to the core. Allow to soak, thermo cycle 3 times to black heat, then back up to welding temp and tap the repair area with a tiny tiny hammer, working any material movement toward the welded area. In this step you are partially checking the initial weld, and helping close up and hairline openings at the surface. If the weld holds, straighten, thermo cycle, heat treat, feel on top of the world. If it doesn't hold, then you realize maybe a 26" blade, while giving up some pattern, wouldn't have been so bad after all.

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The serpent on the Vehmaa sword isn't a repair job, though there are flaws in the serpent itself and around it and on other parts of the blade. The way it's built would mean you would have to know it had a flaw before you ever started assembling the bars if the serpent was meant to fix anything.

 

I disagree.

I don't know if it was a repair job that took one broken sword and made it good again; I personally favour the idea of it being a repair job made up of new and old or just different material that did not all start out as being intended for the same sword. The idea of it being made like that from scratch is too strange, it's too shambolic.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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