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Multibar billet - what to make?


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Ok, so I've twisted a couple of billets clock and counter clockwise, squared'em off, put a piece of a rasp inbetween and forge welded.

 

Now I've got a 250mm long billet.. What do I do? Do I make one long knife, or two shorter ones? I can just weld on a piece of steel for the tang, or simply forge out a piece. There is enough steel for that.

 

Question is - how are the welds at the ends? I'll need to make the "ends" go on the handle side of the knife if I decide to make two....

 

Hmm, what to do, what to do... Any suggestions?

 

The stack pre-weld:

stack-1.jpg

 

The stack after forge welding:

stack-2.jpg

 

Any suggestions and input is extremely appreciated. :D

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ok, so just a suggestion looking at your steel.

 

I would square the billet en re-stack whit 90degree difference and weld ends on one side for the tang.

The rasp would be bottom facing making the it the cutting edge of one blade.

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ok, so just a suggestion looking at your steel.

 

I would square the billet en re-stack whit 90degree difference and weld ends on one side for the tang.

The rasp would be bottom facing making the it the cutting edge of one blade.

 

My initial idea was to let the rasp go in a straight line in the middle of the blade, separating the two bars of twisted steel - like the spine of a feather. :)

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A large blade usually shows off the pattern best.

 

Whatever you decide on I would recommend forging the point of the blade to the middle of the pattern or cutting a "bird's mouth" there and welding it together to keep the pattern flowing into the tip of the blade.

 

Gary

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A large blade usually shows off the pattern best.

 

Whatever you decide on I would recommend forging the point of the blade to the middle of the pattern or cutting a "bird's mouth" there and welding it together to keep the pattern flowing into the tip of the blade.

 

Gary

 

I have never done the bird's mouth cutting, but I think I will most definitely give it a try with this one. :)

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I have never done the bird's mouth cutting, but I think I will most definitely give it a try with this one. :)

 

I've only done it once so far, but I'd recommend you do it by hand, and not with the spiffy new power hammer. I was nervous about getting it to weld, and was bound and determined to scare the steel into welding as Alan would say. As a result I forgot about pattern control for a couple of hammer blows and ended up with a wonky bit of pattern at the tip of the blade.

 

Hos is the hammer doing?

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I've only done it once so far, but I'd recommend you do it by hand, and not with the spiffy new power hammer. I was nervous about getting it to weld, and was bound and determined to scare the steel into welding as Alan would say. As a result I forgot about pattern control for a couple of hammer blows and ended up with a wonky bit of pattern at the tip of the blade.

 

Hos is the hammer doing?

Haha! :lol:

 

Yes, I will definitively do it by hand. My powerhammer is more of a mechanic than a surgeon I'm afraid. Pattern control is what worries me, even when doing it by hand. Symetry is hard enough, beating it in there with a hammer can't be especially easy I presume.

 

The power hammer is doing great. I haven't forged at all for a little while now since I broke my back, but I am up and running again - and so is the powerhammer. I used it today. I do not regret getting it... not by a long shot... ^_^

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Right now I am thinking of doing as Mr. Mulky suggested - and go for a bird's mouth approach. I am thinking of making it one single blade, however - I'd like to make the blade taper narrowly from the middle of the blade to the tip... this would mean forging somewhat to shape. I worry though - that I'd disturb the nice straight line in the middle - and it would get all wiggly... hmmm...

 

I am thinking of a "feather" theme here...

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Ok, so I decided to go with twins.. And no bird's mouth... Sorry about that, it will have to wait until next time. But I will do it... smith's honor! ;)

 

daily pic-2.jpg

 

And some fun-pics!

 

daily pic-1.jpg

 

daily pic2-1.jpg

 

daily pic2-2.jpg

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Alright, so I did some grinding, normalizing, hardening and annealing today.

 

I noticed something though... I tried etching the blade - but I got absolutely nothing! :o

quench-1.jpg

 

And then I quenched it - and got this:

quench-2.jpg

 

As you can see - there is indeed a pattern there. But I dunno... 30% hydrochloric acid is obviously doing nothing to it.. As for the steel - it's mystery steel.. The billet of folded steel was made like 7-10 years ago. The one in the middle of the knife is a rasp...

 

Oh, and one more fun-pic. :)

heat-1.jpg

 

Any ideas on the etching though? I sanded it to #240 grit for a quick look. Etched it for like 20 minutes straight... nothing... :rolleyes:

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Maybe try ferric chloride? I have no experience of Hydrochloric so can't comment on that but I always use ferric with nice results.

Done, and done!

 

I've just ordered 1L of ferric chloride. :)

So difficult to get. Seemingly not readily available in any stores... Found one Norwegian dealer, so.. fingers crossed.

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I have tried rust dissolvant (5min) followed up by vinegar (15min 2x ) witch worked for me. Still need to put effort in obtaining some ferric

I will try to etch the blade for an ungodly amount of time - and see if that helps. Either way - I will be getting that ferric next week. I suppose I'll just have to work on the other knife in the meanwhile if the hydrochloric doesn't bite. :D

 

Oh, and my progress:

polish-1.jpg

 

Currently at #800 grit. Next up is #1500 and then #2500... At that point - I'll etch.

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The pattern will be much more visible now that it is heat treated. I'd recommend etching slowly in short bursts. You can always etch more, bit it is hard to undo it if you dissolve away too much steel.

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