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Questions about Hay Budden Anvils


C Craft

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How were the logos put on the Hay Budden anvils, were they cast in or stamped in????

 

They seem to be some with the logo all out of wack! There are some that look as if the middle of the logo was (stamped) over-top of the rest of the logo!!! Or parts are way off center from the rest of the logo!

 

Why are the logo so hard to see is that just wear and tear, or bad job of placing the logo??

 

 

I have a Hay Budden the weighs out on the bath scales at 143 lbs does that sound about right????

 

Did some of the logos say:

Hay Budden

Manufacturing

Brooklyn NY

VS

Hay Budden

Manufacturing Co

Brooklyn NY

Mine appears to have just Manufacturing on it, instead of Manufacturing Co.

 

Take a look at this search, https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=hay%20budden%20anvil%20logo andyou will see examples of what I am speaking of. Everything from printing over top of other parts of the logo, to what appears to be Manufacturing and Manufacturing Co, I have even seen examples that the Hay-Budden is hyphenated.

 

Can anvils be dated as to how the logo appears????

 

Any info you can share will be appreciated!!

 

Also I can only read parts of my logo, the Y on the Hay, BUDD on the Budden,

 

ufacturi on the Manufacturing

 

and OOKYL on the Brooklyn

 

and the N on NY. However it appears to be one of those that has the logo centered and balanced.

 

Is it considered taboo to re-do the lettering and fill in what is missing???? I am thinking of highlighting the logo with a bit of color and can't decide to highlight what is there or fill in the missing letters!!!

 

Mine is not pristine and appears to have been used and sometimes abused the edges are not crisp but she is mine and I love her!!

 

Shop009.jpg

 

She came with the block. I have since reworked it but have yet to take a pick of the new block!

Shop008.jpg

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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I can find the date if you give me the serial number, which is on the left front foot if you're looking directly at the horn. I will check on the marks, but HB is notorioua for doing a terrible job stamping them in. Double strikes, half-strikes, missing entirely.

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Alan I have had this ole gal about six years now and only a little down time has led me to ask more questions about her past!! You know sometimes you have to respect a lady's past as her own! :lol:

 

I thought I had looked it over pretty well. So when you told me where to look I went back and had another look.

 

I rubbed her left foot with soap stone and I see what appears to be maybe a 1 about what might be the middle of the serial number. The pitting and marks of time have pretty much have left it in-distinguishable. The appears to be a number that maybe a 6 to the left of the square hole middle under the horn.

 

I tried a crayon rub on the logo earlier and frankly I can see in sunlight better what is there, than I could read off of the crayon rub!! The pits and dings make it all run together!

 

I am afraid the pits and the years of abuse may having taken a toll on the serial numbers!! I have my suspicions that this anvil was heavily polished with a wire wheel before I got introduced to her, and there over jealous effort to remove the rust they also removed what was left of her markings!!!

 

Unless there is another process to make the numbers pop, I don't think I am ever going to be able to see them. It is cloudy here today so when I get a sunlight day I will make another attempt at reading them!

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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The only other thing to check is if there is a weld around the waist. Before about 1914 they were wrought iron with a steel face, after that they had a wrought or mild base and a solid steel top half. Or maybe she wants to keep her true age to herself!

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Alan, will take a better look tomorrow sometime I got my Grandboys for the night and we have a rip roaring card game to play!!! :lol:

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Alan I went back and took another look at the ole gal! I don't think it has weld around the waist. Rather I think it has the plate so that would date her back to 1914 and or prior. That might explain why time has taken its toll on the logo and serial number! True Wrought tends to be pitted any way and time and moisture seem to deepen that!!!

 

The plate might also explain why she is wringer, good rebound but she wrings. Not as bad since I put some magnets under her nose but a wringer any way. I just tell her, sing to me baby :excl::D

 

Alan, does that 143lb weight sound about right or would it have been cast as a 145 lb????

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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I think you're on the right track, age-wise. She was forged, not cast, so odd weight numbers are more likely. H-B markings are notoriously shallw and wear off quickly. My local guild has a later one in really good shape, and the markings are almost totally gone.

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Thanks for all your input on this anvil, your knowledge is very valuable!!

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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