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I hope I post in the right area..I'm a new here and a beginning knife maker


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My first post...

Hi my Name is Steve... I'm a beginning knife maker just in the last year...even though in my younger years I learned how to make knives but I still consider myself a noobie because back then to now the hustle and grind of the working world of adult hood took hold of me and my knowledge and skill didn't really progress... Fast forward 16+ years and now I've began to pick backup knife making as a way to relax on my time off from work. My way of "R&R"

My jobs have taken me through a lot of different fields and so I like my work to kinda reflect that... from Kitchen Cutlery to EDCknives

Thank you and I'm happy to be here.

 

Some of my work in the last year I hope you guys like it.

 

Stock removel 1095/Damascus steel

 

This is what started the knife making bug in me again a year ago

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Some of my work in the last couple mouths:

 

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IMG_3179_zpssbnr6iok.jpeg

 

 

IMG_3229_zpsk1wq3sld.jpeg

 

IMG_3227_zpseqbymqu2.jpeg

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Welcome!

I don't do the sort of modern, tactical look myself. However, those are nice looking knives, especially for this point in your evolution. I am impressed by the originality and creativity, as well as some traditional features. I think you are getting your feet under you for some cool production.

 

Nice hamon, too (what steel was it? You may be able to get better hamons with attention to steel, etchant, and polishing techniques).

 

I have an obsession, which is I try to never make a full tang knife without a metal bolster. That is purely my issue, and I understand the argument that it adds weight. For me, however, I think a knife should have either metal bolsters or a metal guard (even if they are aluminum, copper, brass, bronze is becoming my favorite, or damascus or stainless... like I said, my obsession).

 

Please keep showing us your work. It is always good to have new folks join us.

 

kc

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Think I see a 4x36 grinder there? I used one up until recently and it served me well, granted a bit difficult to grind with. Your work is clean, functional, and has a defining style. I think you're well on your way. Great job and looking forward to seeing more.

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I really appreciate all the feed back!!!

 

@Kevin... it's 1095 with oil quench "I'm still trying to fine a good source for W2... I've been doing a lot of research to fine the best Tecnics process to bring out the Hamon in the mean time

 

@Brian D ....Thank you

 

@Austin .... Thank you

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bolsters aren't really much more difficult than handle scales. Just be sure to get pin stock that matches the bolster material exactly, and then when you pin, countersink the holes just a very little bit, and beat the pins like they stole something. Beat the hell out of them with a ball peen (when you start, leave about the diameter of a 1/8" pin sticking up out of the hole). If you do this, you can then file or grind the hammer marks off, and the bolster will appear as if it is just one smooth piece of metal.

 

When you sand the transition from bolster to handle scale, always back the paper with a piece of metal or stone, and only one sheet of paper wrapped over the backer (one layer thick paper), and always sand from the metal toward the wood. If needed, put a couple of layers of tape over the wood to protect it from filings and dust from the metal (especially light woods). Otherwise, you will sand a dip into your handle material. Do the same thing around and over the pins in a handle.

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The range of opinions is what makes this forum great. While i am still clearly on the beginner stage of the scale in regards to knife making, I find the use of metal bolsters to be glaringly offensive. Takes away from the simplicity and flow of a knife IMHO.

 

Kevin, just curious, is your bolster fetish ;) aesthetic or functional in origin?

 

That being said, when I first looked at this post I really liked the subtle nature of the wooden "bolster" on the chef's knife (thin spacer with same or similar wood grain). Added character without the smack of contrast a metal bolster typically provides.

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You know, I think my hangup is really aesthetic, and just my obsession. Whenever I make a full tang knife, I just don't feel like it is done unless I put bolsters on it. I do the same with bolsters or guard on through tang and hidden tang designs. It just feel right for me. So, I guess that means it is aesthetic.

 

I like bolsters to prevent staining and scraping of handle slabs, but that benefit is not so great that it always outweighs the increase in weight that comes along with bolsters. So, there are functional benefits, but that isn't what drives it for me. It is my obsession that someone may see my knife and think it isn't done... .

 

edited to add: Please don't think that I am saying anyone else should always or even mostly use metal bolsters. It is just something I have a hangup about with my own work. For example, I like Murray Carter's work (though some don't) and he almost never takes the extra time and hassle to put metal bolsters. Especially on neck knives, that need to be light. I don't think everyone should abide by my little quirks. I just mentioned it as my own approach to design. Not everyone should make daos and jians, either :)

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
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@kevin...thank you for your advice... I will take note of everything you said and put it into play during that project...

 

@aweller... I'm going to try incorporate a metal bolster to my chef knife in the near future here or there... the function is to help keep the blade more sterile during Heavy raw meet prep where you will use the whole length of the blade and when cleaning It'll make things easier

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