• Announcements

    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Jay Ramirez

Forging Endmills

8 posts in this topic

I recently aquired an assortment of junk endmills from 3/4 to 1 1/4. Does anyone think its worth trying to forge them. I believe they are a cobalt hss thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try it for fun, hss is a real pain whit narrow forging temperatures

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add to what Karim said, HSS is technically forgeable, but I've never been able to do it without creating the steel equivalent of cottage cheese. Personally I'd either send them to Boggs Tool for sharpening or scrap 'em, but that's just me. http://www.boggstool.com/page18.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another fun usage is for adding a bit of alloy content while hearth melting. 1 end mill with a bunch of other scrap could lead to something quite nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for example my profile pic is hss damask aka cottage cheese, terrible result but had fun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for example my profile pic is hss damask aka cottage cheese, terrible result but had fun

That looks.. interesting.

 

We talked about this before:

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=26663

 

I have lots of HSS bits and endmills because I have a mill and a few lathes. They're always useful after they chip or burn up. I regrind them to be form scrapers and stuff for fullers. They're already super hard, and you can silver solder them to mild steel without losing hardness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0