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Wesley Alberson

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Hi Wes, nice videos. I chose to watch the long version of course. I like the tenon design. Unique. Keep at it. 

I wonder though during the forging if you may have worked it a bit cold at times and if this had any effect of the final blade? 

We're the fittings just mild steel? 

Keep up the good work man. 

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Forging cold didn't seem to cause any problems. I know it can cause stress in the blade and it's an inefficient use of effort, it's just a habit of mine because the hammer I use still moves steel when it is a barely visible red. The fittings were indeed mild steel. The bolster can be made of any softer metal, however the kind of pressure created at the butt plate requires something tougher. The wedge scrapes against the tang when it is being tapped in, it's inevitable, which is why I round over the inside of the tang hole to keep sharp edges from digging into the wedge. I suppose that the butt plate could be made of a soft metal, as long as the wedge is made of steel and it doesn't have sharp corners that will dig into the copper/brass. Ideally, the wedge would be made of hardened high-carbon steel so it doesn't get marks from the tang, but the way it works now still works very well.

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I love what you are doing.
I have a few suggestions.
The first is in forging.
Start with a preform.
A pukko's would be similar to the sunobe you use for a a japanese blade.
Basically it looks like a cigar from the profile.
This gives you tapers from side to side.
Then taper the sunobe from both ends.
The thickest part should be at the shoulders unless you are making a Seax or have a ricasso which is generally the same dimension.
Then taper the blade on its flats from the ends to the thickest part.
This allows you to forge from one end to the other and not having to go back and forth back and forth which can cause you to be thicker in some places and thinner in others.

The other suggestion is in your punching and drifting.
Using the tang as a drift is fine but if you make punches that are the general size of the tang at the point about a half inch from the shoulder then you don't have to use the tang as a drift and use a lot of heats to drive the guard on.
You'd only need one heat.
So you're saving heat and effort and the chance of bending or twisting your tang.

Keep up the good work.

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Thanks for the tips! My forging is not as efficient as I would like. I really need to make some punches. One problem I had with punching the hole in the guard was that the punch was too wide and left gaps, which is why I filed the rest of the way. One thing that I realize now is that I could punch a hole slightly larger than the tang, then just heat the guard up and hammer on the guard while it is up against the shoulders of the blade/slightly away from the shoulders. The gaps on the sides would close, and as long as the tang is properly tapered, the guard should come off.

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I believe some silicon spray on the tang area before putting the guard on might help to prevent sticking.

Edited by Charles du Preez
Clarification

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4 hours ago, Wesley Alberson said:

Thanks for the tips! My forging is not as efficient as I would like. I really need to make some punches. One problem I had with punching the hole in the guard was that the punch was too wide and left gaps, which is why I filed the rest of the way. One thing that I realize now is that I could punch a hole slightly larger than the tang, then just heat the guard up and hammer on the guard while it is up against the shoulders of the blade/slightly away from the shoulders. The gaps on the sides would close, and as long as the tang is properly tapered, the guard should come off.

This is why I suggest making task specific punches.
Remember the tang tapers too. From thin to thick at the shoulders.
So if your punch is slightly thinner in both thickness and width than the shoulders the guard should almost fit and then can be driven on hot.
I would do this with the knife tang vertical and not horizontal.
If you drive the guard down onto the shoulders it will leave an indent like a seat.
You have either use it like that which is kind of rustic or you can grind the face of the guard flush and then you will have minimal fitting to do with a file at the end.
As you're filing test fit cold and drive the guard on. Any deformation around the tang slot shows you whee you need to file.
It will look like the steel has pooched outwards.
Also, I didn't notice if you were doing this but punching is done from both sides.
One side to the bottom and then the punch out the slug from the other side.

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Hi Wes. Nice Video. Thanks for the upload. @JJ Simon thanks for sharing some good pointers and thoughts there.

Wes, after you cut the 'window' into the sheath i noticed that it is quite thick still, is this they way most sheaths are or do you think this is something you would thin down on the next one?

I assume its reasonably difficult to guess the thickness as you travel down its length as you only have the throat to gauge off? 

Being from Australia, i have never seen a woodpecker doing its thing before so thanks for sharing this also. Great. 

Keep up the good work. 

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I would made it thinner, but I need the mouth of the scabbard to be as wide around as the handle. In order to get the scabbard super thin, the scabbard would have to have an inwards curve, which wouldn't be a bad idea.

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Nice on Wes, what was that stuff you put on the handle?

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Just now, Chris C-S said:

Nice on Wes, what was that stuff you put on the handle?

It is dried and crushed up maple leaf. I used lacquer to build up layers of it, and it's a nice texture. It looks like purple avocado skin!

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I liked this vid over on the Tube. Would have been nice to see the finishing, esp. the straightening of that hectic warp. lol. 

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That last one was really fun to watch! I found the few "oh 5#!7" M0M3N75 to be pretty amusing. I get those pretty frequently myself :lol:. I would've just mig welded them, but I do like your style! 

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1 hour ago, Zeb Camper said:

That last one was really fun to watch! I found the few "oh 5#!7" M0M3N75 to be pretty amusing. I get those pretty frequently myself :lol:. I would've just mig welded them, but I do like your style! 

I'll mig weld it up for sure, I just wanted some practice with forge welding. In hindsight, I could have punched a hole through each die and riveted it on some other stock. That way I would be hitting the die, rather than the thinner stock, which is the reason it broke in the first place.

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