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ScottWright

WIP First Camp Knife

13 posts in this topic

Still new at smithing this will only be my fourth completed knife only the second I'm happy enough to show. I should have it wrapped up early this coming week it is a gift for my brother this holiday season. All tips and advice greatly appreciated. The guard will be made from a piece of cable damascus.

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What is the steel?

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Scrap to be honest but after talking with one of our mechanics at work I believe it is 5160. It is a spring from a train.

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That took a lot of pounding to break down that spring, lots of forging muscles built there!

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Scrap to be honest but after talking with one of our mechanics at work I believe it is 5160. It is a spring from a train.

OK. So you have a reason to believe that it might be good steel for a blade. Did you use all of it, or did you save some for HT testing?

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I gave it a spark test and quenched to make sure that it would harden. I only used a very small peiece. I have another dozen rings of it.

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I have one of those train springs, haven't used it yet. There's a 75% chance it's 5160, 15% chance it's 9260, 10% it's something else, but if you follow the recommendations for 5160 it ought to work fine. Most coil spring steels can be heat treated about the same. Except for the post-2006 or so Ford pickup truck coils, they are some sort of low-alloy precipitation hardening thing that uses a scanning induction hardening technique.

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It is from a seimens electric train engine. I oil quenched it and it took quite well. File skates off like ice.

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Hello agian, life is busy and I have not had a chance to work anything since my last post. Anyway I finished my file work, hardened, tempered and sanded yesterday/today. Cleaned and etched in vingear and start on the handle I'll be wrapping it up tomorrow. The handle is maple I already had on hand.

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I finished up today. Overall I'm happy with it, still learning and I know the person it is going to will really like it. Handle is maple finished with danish oil.

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I would suggest that you make the handle a little less slab like. Maybe with a little palm swell. I find a Japanese cabinet maker's rasp and bastard files good to shape handles with. You can get the Japanese cabinet maker's files from Woofcraft. They're a little on the pricey side but all you need for handles are the smallest ones they sell. They are much more aggressive than the rasps that you get at the tool-in-a-box stores.

 

Doug

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Thanks for the advice Doug. I have been having a difficult time finding a rasp I like. I'm currently using two old delta rasps. They are in ok shaoe but a much better quality than even a new one from the hardware store. I'll be making a purchase on the next pay day. This weeks is going to a belt grinder. Thanks

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