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Explaining Pattern Welding (virtually)


Niels Provos

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While I don't have any new photos of blades - I broke the last two swords I made, I thought I would share some progress on a new video in which I plan to explain pattern development. Here are some low-res example illustrations.

 

Screen Shot 2016-12-27 at 5.13.16 PM.jpg

Screen Shot 2016-12-27 at 5.14.14 PM.jpg

Screen Shot 2016-12-27 at 5.05.10 PM.jpg

 

The video will show an animation of stacking, twisting and progressively removing layers, etc. I plan on showing the typical herring bone pattern, perhaps some interrupted twists, etc.

 

Are there any patterns you would like to see explained? I am still thinking of more animations of historical patterns to include.

 

Thanks,

Niels.

 

Addendum: Since then I have produced more detailed videos that visualize the pattern welding process using computer simulations.

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w's would make a good topic to show how different things can become from a minor change in the beginning. Also, it would show the squashing effects on the layers very well. Just my ideas. I am glad to see you doing this.

thanks.

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Crushed W, Feather, 4 bar variants, jellyroll...

 

+1 to Feather

If you understand the basic W pattern, feather is one more manipulation in place of the final drawing out, accordion cut, and flatten.

I never knew what "crushed W" was, I thought all W patterns were "crushed"......... :blink:

 

Thanks Niels, this should be great fun to watch.

Edited by Joshua States

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Josh

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If you understand the basic W pattern, feather is one more manipulation in place of the final drawing out, accordion cut, and flatten.

I never knew what "crushed W" was, I thought all W patterns were "crushed"......... :blink:

 

Thanks Niels, this should be great fun to watch

I thought a feather was just a vertical cut on a stacked layer billet that pulls the layers into the cut and then were rewelded?

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JJ you can do it on a plain stack of flat laminates, but it looks much better when a W pattern is used.

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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I've always admired the work of Daryl Meier and his method used on his... Well, perhaps it would be easier to show you:

m2.jpg

I haven't quite figured that one out...

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
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If there's a good way to randomly add in distortions (pitting/hammer marks/grinding between stacks) it could be cool to see what random patterns a simulation makes.

 

I've always admired the work of Daryl Meier and his method used on his... Well, perhaps it would be easier to show you:

m2.jpg

I haven't quite figured that one out...

Wow, I've never even been able to draw the right spacing/number for the stars on a US flag. Now I admire his work as well.

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IIRC he used a method similar to canned mosaic, but used solid bars ground to fit tight instead of shims and powdered steel, then added his own incredible skill for the curved tile effect. Still a very impressive pattern after nearly 30 years!

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