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Bogdan,great job,boss! :)

 

Why the symmetry?Is it a single-bevel tool,capable of instant re-handling?Hewing,or specifically purposed in some other way?

 

Fantastic forging,like Alan says,(and as usual for you... :)

 

Good forging in the New Year,hope that all's well.

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that is lovely. great work!

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Bogdan,great job,boss! :)

 

Why the symmetry?Is it a single-bevel tool,capable of instant re-handling?Hewing,or specifically purposed in some other way?

 

Fantastic forging,like Alan says,(and as usual for you... :)

 

Good forging in the New Year,hope that all's well.

Hi Jake! It’s been a long time!

The symmetry (double beardness) mainly appeared as a result of my search for ballance since in the single bearded axe of this type the handle that sticks out f the eye on top creates notable imbalance in weight and also visually unsatisfactory (for me). The symmetric double bearded ones were also archeologically well known .

 

It is really amazing how good is the handle connection due to the “mustaches” on the back and at the same time how easy is to take it off and replace with longer (shorter) handle. No other other self wedged type really works like that – I am 100%sure.

 

But the really great stuff about it is that head without handle can be used as a plane that fits so nicely in the hand with the thumb and index finger resting against the inside curves of the blade and the palm against the eye mustaches. You get a really universal tool with that allows you to do almost anything with wood. I wil post video and pictures soon...

 

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Thanks,Bogdan,i see your point(-s),yes.The balance on these axes is a Very delicate issue,and i can see how all these factors affect it significantly.

 

The photo of that old one is amazing....Wonder of that's a wear-spot,that declivity in the edge....(it being a center of Percussion,the most used portion of edge....

 

That B&W diagram below is interesting too:That #9 there is shown to be Thick,at the juncture of eye and the blade....Too bad that #6 is not shown...THAT is,i believe,one of the main differentiating principles among this "type" of axe...Alas,all too often they're only shown in profile...That difference can well equal to 100 g or more...Quite a bit,for a light(-ish)tool like that...

 

But,yeah,thanks again for all your hard work on the study of these,you're something else,man... :)

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Thanks again,Bogdan.

 

I think that that thickness MAY indicate the difference between the construction methods.

It's Very difficult,almost impossible,to maintain that thickness there if a weld is to be made in that same location(i.e.Assymetric weld).

 

Meanwhile,Your method(slit and drifted) does allow to retain that mass there...

 

Sorry to be so pedantic,but am more and more convinced that the two methods result in two differently-purposed/(certainly-balanced) tools

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I think it is possible to maintain thickness in welded neck if you insert a wedge here.

You might be right with the ballance/ purpose issue. However my assumption is that it is mainly cultural/tradition/genetical issue

Let's aslo recall that all the known edge cuts of that mustachy type show not steel welded but carbonized blade.

 

i really think that caucasian technological "ears" are sticking out here.

Edited by Bogdan Popov
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