Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Joshua States

It Lives!

Recommended Posts

This knife has been raised out of the Graveyard of Broken Dreams, and returned to life!

(yeah, I know. Another bloody Bowie knife)

Stats:

8-7/8" 1095 blade, NS guard, frame and center spacer. O-1 blued spacers. 410 SS with black fiber liners. The finial is made from a ball bearing. Handle scales are stabilized black ash. 1/16" NS pins, domed and polished. You can see the Hamon (only got a pic of one side) in I Want to See Your Hamon.

Full shot 1.JPG

File work 2-opt.jpgFinial.JPG

DSCN3168.JPG

Edited by Joshua States
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent work Joshua. I, for one, will never tire of seeing "another bloody Bowie" :) I really love all of the small details, the file work and the coining. All of it. Great stuff my friend

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those domed pins are really slick. Very nice work. May I ask what your process is for getting those teeny pins so uniformly domed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one! Good clean lines and beautiful file work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. There are a few defects, but it is raised from the dead after all.

 

 

Those domed pins are really slick. Very nice work. May I ask what your process is for getting those teeny pins so uniformly domed?

Adam, I use a somewhat modified Nick Wheeler method. He has a 2-part video set on the ABS YouTube channel.

Here is part 1:

and part 2:

 

The biggest differences between his method and mine are that I glue my pins in (leave them long) when I assemble the handle or knife and trim them down to 1/16" off the surface whereas he uses a dummy pin in the glue-up and preforms the first pin head off the knife and inserts the final pin after removing the dummy. I lay a drill bit on the face of the handle against the pin and file it down to the drill bit. This makes all of the pins have the same amount of material above the handle surface to deform. That helps in making them uniform. The other difference is that I use a sheet of acetate (.0045" thick) to protect the handle while I peen & polish the pins while Nick uses multiple layers of blue painter's tape. I'll post some photos of the tools I use.

If I can remember to, I'll take some WIP photos of the process the next time I do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somehow the videos got reversed :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to hijack you Joshua, but if they are interested, I posted about doming pins while back if people are interested.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great stuff mate...risen from the dead.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for taking the time to share, Joshua. That acetate thing is a neat trick. I have tried preforming the heads off of the knife but had issues getting the domes even, so I started gluing them, too.

 

Wes, thanks for the link! I hadn't seen your post before. Very helpful and informative, as always.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to hijack you Joshua, but if they are interested, I posted about doming pins while back if people are interested.

Excellent Wes. I had forgotten about that post of yours. Thanks for adding it, that's the basic method for doming pins.

Here is the tool jig I made for holding the knife. It has two parts, the frame and the anvil. You can see the modified nail sets standing on the side (same as Wes shows in his post). I also have a piece of 3/8 round rod that I put a smooth round end on. I use this as the final smoothing tool over the pin surface.

The frame is 3/8" x 4" plate.

Pin tools (2).JPG

 

The anvil is made from a piece of 1-1/2" solid square bar, and a stainless steel hex head bolt that I have domed and polished.

The height of the anvil is adjustable and you can lock it in place using the double nut. Magnets keep it from sliding.

 

Pin tools.JPG

 

I glued pieces of rubber to the pressure plates to provide a non-marring surface for the blade clamp. I still wrap the blade in blue shop towel just because....

Pin tools (3).JPG

Edited by Joshua States
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an incredibly clever setup. Nicely done. Many thanks!

Edited by Adam Betts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like this Bowie Joshua, I love the blade shape and the handle is superbly finished all in all that's one fine looking knife. The pictures of your riveting jig are really helpful, you can guess what I'll be making in the next couple of days.

First class work.

 

Steve

Edited by Steve Nowacki
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know how I managed to not reply to this.

I flippin' love this knife. It looks just right.

 

That is all. I thing this an excellent idea, and it appears to have been executed well, too.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Steve & Kevin. I love doing knives like this, with all the little pimping and frills, but it brings into sharp focus why I only make a few knives a year. Good gravy these take a long time.

Steve, I love that pin jig and unlike most of the tools I have made, I still haven't found a way to improve it yet! It's so easy to just rotate the whole jig on the bench and get a different angle. The best part is, the only pieces I didn't have lying around the shop were the nail sets and the stainless bolt.

Make one and you will never regret it.

 

I cannot see the links to Wheeler's videos. Did they get deleted somehow?

Edited by Joshua States

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been meaning to make on of those jigs ever since I saw the one that Nick Wheeler uses. Good stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great job Josh, your file work on this is fluid like mesmerizing !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto all above - Love the file work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...