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1850s French Folder?


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IMG_20170203_181905_zpsfaqqytzf.jpgIMG_20170203_181927_zpsyfvh9d4p.jpgIMG_20170203_181844_zpszubnrep2.jpgIMG_20170204_193520682_zpssxoqvn4f.jpgThis knife measures 3 1/4" closed, 5 7/8" open, has a thin surgical blade with a very nice taper and spine. The saddle spring locks the blade on a ball like stud that protrudes from the back of the blade. I added the brain tanned deer skin chord that helps me release the spring- normally a steel ring here. The handle is one piece horn. Blade is marked P.YRE with A Bayonne below that. Great early lock!

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It only clicks when it locks. What baffles me are the pins that hold the spring in place. The groove is cut into one solid piece of horn, but the pin placement is low enough that it has one pin per side. Just not sure how the maker got the pins to peen over and stay secure. The spring is tough so that pin being lower is good. I guess I always thought it would be one pin all the way through.

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That is so cool! Does the spring click as you open it? I have seen similar knives called "ratchet folders" for the sound they make.

Sounds like you're describing the "navaja carraca," (which means something like "clackety knife"), a traditional Spanish knife of very similar design that has several little ratchet-teeth on the base of the blade that engage the lock, famous for the sound they make. Apparently the style was popular with cutthroats and brigands, and the "carraca" was a sound you never wanted to hear walking down a lonely street in the evening.

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It only clicks when it locks. What baffles me are the pins that hold the spring in place. The groove is cut into one solid piece of horn, but the pin placement is low enough that it has one pin per side. Just not sure how the maker got the pins to peen over and stay secure. The spring is tough so that pin being lower is good. I guess I always thought it would be one pin all the way through.

The spring will hold the pins in place in tension forever. As usual with most super simple designs, it holds itself together

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It only clicks when it locks. What baffles me are the pins that hold the spring in place. The groove is cut into one solid piece of horn, but the pin placement is low enough that it has one pin per side. Just not sure how the maker got the pins to peen over and stay secure. The spring is tough so that pin being lower is good. I guess I always thought it would be one pin all the way through.

The spring will hold the pins in place in tension forever. As usual with most super simple designs, it holds itself together

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It only clicks when it locks. What baffles me are the pins that hold the spring in place. The groove is cut into one solid piece of horn, but the pin placement is low enough that it has one pin per side. Just not sure how the maker got the pins to peen over and stay secure. The spring is tough so that pin being lower is good. I guess I always thought it would be one pin all the way through.

The spring will hold the pins in place in tension forever. As usual with most super simple designs, it holds itself together

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/22/2017 at 1:31 AM, Hloh said:

Hey! 

I have similar one, mine is made around 1910.

That is a really slick design.

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My Grandfather gave me one just like that with the horn handle. Flying somewhere in the first year or two after 9/11, airport security took it from me. They wouldn't let me to turn around and mail it to myself, just took it. Now some dude has a family heirloom. 

They are really sweet little knives.

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