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Integral multibar fighter.


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Here’s my latest, a recurve fighter/bowie with 12” blade and overall length of about 17”. It is a second iteration of the last integral kukri I built.

 

The blade has got a tall hollow grind, and is pretty light and fast for its size… balance point is about 1.5 inches before the guard. The clip grind aids in this.

The construction is full integral, with the blade and guard in 6 bar explosion pattern weld. The handle is sculpted G10. A piece of steel, a handle block, and a pin- pretty simple knife.

Here’s some pics and a vid, you don’t have to enjoy it but I hope you will! Thanks for looking.
 

 

 

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Edited by Salem Straub
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Now that is perfect. I love everything about this. Even without that mesmerising  pattern it would be unreal. Exactly What a handcrafted blade is all about.  Only criticism is I would be too frightened to touch it and ever leve a fingerprint on it.

One question if I may, how many hours would be invested in this?

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Never cease to impress Salem.  The devil is always in the details and you certainly have that covered.  Gorgeous work, and something to look up to.  

Thanks for sharing!

Edited by Wes Detrick
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Salem, that steel is just awesome. It is up there with JDs work in some ways. Truly, that kicks ass. I am really impressed. The forge-welded bolsters are a great idea.

 

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Great work Salem! I have been watching your work since I first meant you on another forum and you are really turning out some top shelf work!!! Two thumbs up!!!

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Thanks everyone for the encouraging feedback!
Rob, IDK, I kinda lose track on these.  Somewhere from 30-40 hours perhaps?

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Absolutely mind blowing, The pattern I can't even begin to describe, simply amazing.

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Amazing work dude.  I'll never look at these integrals the same way after your WIP on the last one.  (I mean that in a good way!)

Is this the knife you showed after parkerizing in the "What did you do in your shop" sub-forum?  If so, I assume this is as opposed to a typical FeCl etch?

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Brian, it is the same knife.  Actually, the parkerizing is in addition to the ferric chloride etch.
The ferric etch should be deep enough that topography is readily felt.  Then it's neutralized and scrubbed off with an old toothbrush and some water.  Wiped dry, and then snaded lightly across the tops with 2000 grit.  This helps the phosphate not bite into the high shiny 15n20 layers, while the low layers remain in a nicely prepped state from the etch, yet without much loose oxide sitting on the surface.  If you don't do this step, finish polishing will show a rather muddy contrast, with smudging of the high layers.

After the pre-sanding, it gets parkerized, and then wet sanded until high contrast, then dry-sanded very lightly to blend, then oil, then a very light buff with pink or green.  After this the contrast should be brilliant shiny layers with little to no grain, and jet black lows with no oxide coming off when wiped with oil.

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Thanks guys! 

I should add, regarding parkerizing, that I do it for two main reasons... uniform, highly durable, black layers, that don't lighten when sanding the shiny bits- and, the knife above is not hardened in the guard or spine up to the clip, yet the finish is still uniform rather than having that distinct change in finish and etch where the steel is still non-hardened.  This allow me to make complex things and not worry about odd geometries in the quench, and also be able to file things to shape after heat treat.  I really like that.

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Salem just one question?  Are we allowed to drool as we look at the pics and video.  :)  Beautiful job even a newbie can see that.

Robert

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