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Rexs
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This is my first attempt at a heat treated blade I was just testing the hated mystery steel , this is a lawnmower blade and maple handle , I learned alot , won't be making the same mistakes again 

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I didn't heat the oil after I hit the CT temp , but the blade didn't warp or crack and I gave it two cycles of 400f for an hour each and this blade is hard as crap it took some work to get an edge on it lol , I did scratch the ricosso  again still learning but this knife was for my dad and for a first knife I know he will never use hell just be happy I made it for him but now I'm studying heat treatment for actual purchased steel wish me luck lol 

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Well, as something to get your feet wet, and something to learn on, I would say it was a success.  Congrats on the first knife :D

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“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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7 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

Well, as something to get your feet wet, and something to learn on, I would say it was a success.  Congrats on the first knife :D

Thank you sir I still have a leaf spring and a coil spring that I'm going to play with and see what I can get out of those after I anneal them because I really want to work on forging in the bevels as much as possible in stead of stock removal to see if I can better my hammer game lol I've got so many ideas but hardly any time 

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13 minutes ago, Rexs said:

 lol I've got so many ideas but hardly any time 

A very common affliction that I think many of us suffer from.  I would definitely encourage practicing the hammer work though.  It just takes a lot of practice.  Hell I am still working at it.

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“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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18 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

A very common affliction that I think many of us suffer from.  I would definitely encourage practicing the hammer work though.  It just takes a lot of practice.  Hell I am still working at it.

One never stops working on the hammer technique, I think.

Matthew Parkinson did wonders for my forging technique in about 30 seconds of explanation a few weeks ago. Changed my whole game around.

Rexs, that is a great first knife. 

Edited by Joshua States
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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

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Agreed, great first knife

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"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon wine.

 

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Using your own knives for a short while may help your design work. It is important to know what works, instead of what just looks good to your eye.

Edited by Tim Crocker
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Crocker Knives

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Great first knife! You should have seen my first ten years ago, it's probably still posted on the forum to my shame. Your're miles ahead of where I started. Mine are just getting to a point that I consider them knives only now. 

I'd recommend ordering some steel from Aldo ( New Jersey Steel Baron ) or even Jantz for that matter. When I got more serious I went with 1095, which was probably a mistake, but I stuck with it. I'm still cracking blades here and there but I know why. Knowing how something went wrong is almost as important as succeeding. Learning Is always much easier when you have more known than unknowns. Maybe grab some 1075 and work that until you're comfortable with it. Stay away from the water quench unless you're just a glutton for punishment like me. Don't go for the super thick steel at first, it'll just wear you out initially. Get something you can persuade a bit with a hammer but doesn't need a whole lot of conversation. If you're time constricted like me it'll help you learn a lot of small lessons and keep your interest up without getting frustrated. 

Read everything you can find from Donn Fogg and Kevin Cashen. All the others on the forum will give a boost and the constructive criticism you need if you want to improve but don't exactly know where to go next. These guys bleed steel shavings.

This forum has been where I've gotten 90% of my info and it'll save you lots of money and time. Make sure you have your safety equipment in order too. This stuff can hurt you in ways you wouldn't even think of and you're gonna get hurt. You might think you've got it covered but double check and read the safety posts. 

While you didn't ask for all that it's the stuff I wish I had known in the beginning. I'd probably be a lot further along if I had.

Welcome to the addiction. 

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Charlie MeekChief Fry Cook

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3 hours ago, Charlie Meek said:

Great first knife! You should have seen my first ten years ago, it's probably still posted on the forum to my shame. Your're miles ahead of where I started. Mine are just getting to a point that I consider them knives only now. 

I'd recommend ordering some steel from Aldo ( New Jersey Steel Baron ) or even Jantz for that matter. When I got more serious I went with 1095, which was probably a mistake, but I stuck with it. I'm still cracking blades here and there but I know why. Knowing how something went wrong is almost as important as succeeding. Learning Is always much easier when you have more known than unknowns. Maybe grab some 1075 and work that until you're comfortable with it. Stay away from the water quench unless you're just a glutton for punishment like me. Don't go for the super thick steel at first, it'll just wear you out initially. Get something you can persuade a bit with a hammer but doesn't need a whole lot of conversation. If you're time constricted like me it'll help you learn a lot of small lessons and keep your interest up without getting frustrated. 

Read everything you can find from Donn Fogg and Kevin Cashen. All the others on the forum will give a boost and the constructive criticism you need if you want to improve but don't exactly know where to go next. These guys bleed steel shavings.

This forum has been where I've gotten 90% of my info and it'll save you lots of money and time. Make sure you have your safety equipment in order too. This stuff can hurt you in ways you wouldn't even think of and you're gonna get hurt. You might think you've got it covered but double check and read the safety posts. 

While you didn't ask for all that it's the stuff I wish I had known in the beginning. I'd probably be a lot further along if I had.

Welcome to the addiction. 

Lol thank you sir and yes addiction indeed , I did get some 1095 from admiral steel just to do some more heat treating and stock removal on good metal , my make shift anvil broke on me lol so I'm gonna get a good one soon and rebuild a hotter forge for some real smithing lol but here is the stock removal blades I did I love it all of it all aspects 

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Oh yeah and some 15n20 to test in a couple months from Aldo , but I'm not expecting perfection with the Damascus plan I have but I will definitely post it for the criticism good or bad 

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