• Announcements

    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  
Mark_Bartlett

Dogbone Dagger Work In Progress

69 posts in this topic

Now of the ivory. Some nice clean mammoth pieces. I marked the profile and then cut in the bandsaw without touching the lines. This gives me a bit of room to have to grind down. There were a few small places in the back of the scales that had thinned out where the core of the ivory and the outer section met that had a bit of separation. I flooded those areas with water thin CA glue. Then sanded them back off flat. Missed the pics where I cut the center out of the frame and lined lined up the frame and guard spacers and marked the pin placement. But it's very similar to how I marked the guard. (and still very rough cut) Then I put the blade up on the little mag chuck and found the height of the center rib of the blade and marked that line on the tang to give a reference to make sure the handle lines up. Now, with everything together, I wrap some thin pinstripers tape around the frame. The last layer is a different color and when grinding the scales down to the profile, grind down till the belt removes the first layer and with a few wraps left under it, it gives you about .025" of a buffer to grind to with the 60 grit that keeps you from getting into the frame. Then some final trimming and hand sanding on the flats and truing up the radius in the flare at the butt. Next is going to be grinding the bevels into the handle.

IMG_0930.jpg

IMG_0932.jpg

IMG_0935.jpg

IMG_0936.jpg

IMG_0939.jpg

IMG_0941.jpg

IMG_0943.jpg

IMG_0944.jpg

IMG_0945.jpg

IMG_0949.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/29/2017 at 10:56 AM, Mark_Bartlett said:

Now for a morning tip as I sit here, not working on anything, but looking at pictures. One thing I tend to do rather than just look at the knife in my hand and see what needs to be fixed is to take pictures. I'm sharing these as a WIP, but a lot of them are more for my benefit than yours. Yesterday evening on facebook and instagram, people ooooh'd and ahhhh'd over the picture of this guard reflection and how seamless the fit is where the coined edge of the spacer meets the guard. Blow the picture up and clarity starts to betray faults that the naked eye can miss after long hours of staring at the same piece while you're working. No fancy camera, just an iPhone 7 Plus.

fullsizeoutput_8d2.jpeg

I'm curious how you are going to fix these small issues?
Because you have a 4 sided shoulder where the pre guard bolster meets the shoulders are you going to grind it flush?
File it flush?
Sand it flush?
How do you do that and still keep the angle of the bolster.
This question applies to both places that its proud.

The same thing with the plunges.
Are you going to put the file guide back on and adjust with files or something else?

This project is amazing and I appreciate you sharing the process.
Thanks,
JJ

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plunges are easy... a few round and teardrop shaped stones and a lot of time. The guard spacer (I've been told it's technically a western habaki) is going to take some patience. The plan is to radius one edge of one of my old sanding blocks and knock it down flush with the ricasso while at the same time finishing the hand sanding of the ricasso. Just takes time. There will still be a slight lip anyway because the blade is damascus and when it's etched there will be high and low spots. But it'll be as close as I can make it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is awesome Mark. Excellent process documentation. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the answer.
As I was looking at it and brain storming I had a few crazy thoughts about how to fix these things.
Your plan is a lot more tame than mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, JJ Simon said:

Thanks for the answer.
As I was looking at it and brain storming I had a few crazy thoughts about how to fix these things.
Your plan is a lot more tame than mine.

Occam's razor JJ. Never forget Occam's razor.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, JJ Simon said:

Thanks for the answer.
As I was looking at it and brain storming I had a few crazy thoughts about how to fix these things.
Your plan is a lot more tame than mine.

Let's hear it... tame may be the way to go to prevent screw ups. Or not. I'm by no means an expert. I'm just a little patient, a whole lot of stubborn, and Mike Quesenberry told me I'm a glutton for punishment. But I am open to suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Occam's razor JJ. Never forget Occam's razor.

I know not this Occam but here goes.

2 hours ago, Mark_Bartlett said:

Let's hear it... tame may be the way to go to prevent screw ups. Or not. I'm by no means an expert. I'm just a little patient, a whole lot of stubborn, and Mike Quesenberry told me I'm a glutton for punishment. But I am open to suggestions.

I was thinking of taping off the ricasso to the edge and then chasing the proud parts to the edge and filing flush
Essentially using the ricasso itself as the guide.
Of course this could be done with a file too.
It would have to be done under magnification and of course its always possible that you'd either dimple the ricasso or leave a file mark in it.
I thought about trying to scribe the face of the proud parts also using the ricasso as the guide again.
And then filing a chamfer to the scribe line so that it meets the lip and then knocking down the high spot on the habaki with a file or stones or whatever works best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so there's no confusion. I'm a novice. I've been making knives for three and a half years. At this point I'm about to pay my dues and rejoin the ABS and start back on the track to getting my JS stamp. (long story short, frustration led to a hiatus)  What you're seeing in these pictures is research in action. Some guys want the answers laid out for them every time they ask a question. I chose to read. I've read through countless WIP threads and filled in the blanks. I've learned from the best even if only through pictures. And others I've had the blessed privilege of talking to in person and over the phone and messenger. I've picked up tips upon tips from amazing people that saw that I was putting forth an effort and not just begging for the secrets of the world. So when you see something that you might have done different, I'm all ears. This is Work In Progress as well as Learning In Progress as this is the first time I've ever attempted a full sized dogbone like this. The bowie I posted last week was my 27th knife. All the rest are in this little photo except for two of them. I'm nobody, but this should serve as an example. If a nobody can do it, what are you holding back.

DB05FD31-2041-43F3-9EF2-7218EE576549.jpg

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For 3 plus years and 27 knives you are slaying it.
Your dedication and education from the masters you are working with shows.
I've been making for 10 years and have gotten no where close to this level of work.
I'm glad you're posting.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Mark_Bartlett said:

Just so there's no confusion. I'm a novice. I've been making knives for three and a half years.

I beg to differ with that opinion. 

nov·ice
ˈnävəs/
noun
  1. a person new to or inexperienced in a field or situation.

You are neither "new" nor "inexperienced" as far as I can tell. The amount of years spent is insignificant when compared to how that time was spent. You have spent your time wisely and have achieved much more than others who did not have, or did not realize there was, access to the resources you have made good use of. You also have the benefit of focus. You zero in on what you want to do, gather as much information about exactly how to do it, and proceed to actualize the vision. Your methods and processes are detailed and specific. There is no "well, I'm going to have a go at making a knife and see what happens" in your endeavors. You have a very specific goal and a laid out plan on how to achieve it. That is not "novice" methodology.

 

BTW: There are only 24 knives in those photos above.......there's 2 knives missing:D

Edited by Joshua States

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/14/2017 at 9:11 PM, Joshua States said:

BTW: There are only 24 knives in those photos above.......there's 2 knives missing:D

Yea, I mentioned that. #2 and #14. Mom has #2 and #14 was a rare occurrence. I finished the knife, had the sheath made, and delivered it without taking pics. Was a nice little lacewood handle hunter.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets start with the handle. I use this little micarta wedge to pry apart scales from the frame and liners when they're on dowel pins. The pins are tight. Just the way I want them. Once I had them off the frame, I marked across the head of the frame to locate center and drilled a 3/16" hole to allow the stud to slide through. Then it was time to reassemble the handle and put it on my little rotation jig to layout the lines where the bevels would be ground to. With those drawn out, I flipped my big D2 file guide over and squared the shoulders up in the guide to set the initial plunge of the handle bevels. with those ground in, it's on to the grinder. I set the adjustable platen at the same angle I used to grind the spacers and started off hogging it away with a new 60 grit AO belt. Then to a scalloped 220 J-Flex to keep from digging into the plunge. 

IMG_1018.jpg

IMG_1017.jpg

IMG_1019.jpg

IMG_1020.jpg

IMG_1021.jpg

IMG_1022.jpg

IMG_1023.jpg

IMG_1032.jpg

IMG_1061.jpg

IMG_1063.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finish the bevels with a file. When I did the push dagger, I tried to hand sand them in and almost ended up remaking them. The files give a much more consistent cut. Darken the center rib with a pencil. The pencil lead will not stain the ivory like a marker would and provides a nice contrast to work with. Then it was a small 1/8" round file to touch up the plunge and some hand sanding with a rounded tip micarta stick and some 220 paper. 

IMG_1066.jpg

IMG_1067.jpg

IMG_1091.jpg

IMG_1100.jpg

IMG_1101.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last few things for the day cut a notch in the tang for the stud. I use high temp 40% silver solder for this. Flux the tang and stud and then heat with a small oxy/propane torch. It'll have to get up around 1100 degrees I believe before the solder starts to flow. Once that's cleaned up, I put the guard in my bending fixture and hooked the ends of the guard. Had to go back and tweak one end over slightly but it's straight now. 

IMG_1102.jpg

IMG_1106.jpg

IMG_1113.jpg

IMG_1114.jpg

IMG_1116.jpg

IMG_1123.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And lastly for today, the whole thing assembled. Now i've got a lot of cleanup, hand sanding, filing, twisting, and finishing to do. All those little details that keep good from being great.

IMG_1120.jpg

IMG_1126.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark, very nice work, your attention to the details is working well for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is quality stuff; both the WIP and the dagger.  Cheers to you Mark!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JJ,

Occam's razor, named for Robert? of Occam.  He postulated that if there's more than one solution to a problem,

then the simplest is usually the most elegant and the best.  I guess it's the foundation for the KISS principle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now