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Very nice! The wrought looks great. Which method did you use, and do you have any pictures of the forging process? 

 

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You certainly are scratching that itch for beautiful clean axes.  I love that wrought body, so much character.

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Thanks for the kind words Collin.  I used the bowtie method.  Then shaped eye around a mandrel.  Next step was slitting body and forge welding bit folllowed by further forging and shaping.  I do not have pictures or video.  I plan on doing it but honesty I'm just trying to get stuff made.  I am lining up my son to help do a video.  

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7 minutes ago, Wes Detrick said:

You certainly are scratching that itch for beautiful clean axes.  I love that wrought body, so much character.

Thanks Wes! I realize I may go a bit overboard.  I should probably take Owen's advice go with "as forged."  I do like Owen's "as forged" look...in fact, my main beveling hammer is one of his dog face hammers with a forged finish. Love it.

For me, I'm trying to find my own path with the finish and shaping.  The only problem (and this is applies to other axe makers) is the customers do not appreciate the work.  To most an axe is just an axe.  There is little understanding about what goes into these things.  Sometimes I spend twice the amount of time forging and shaping an axe head than I do a blade, but I can only get a fraction of the price.  At times, I feel like a business moron spending so many manhours on these axes.  Regardless, I'm going to forge (pun intended) ahead along my path. ;-) When it's all said and done, it makes me feel satisfied artistically to do these things. 

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Wow, that is etched wrought iron wrapping a bit of 1080. I would not have thought wrought would look that good etched!!! Makes me want to try one, someday!! That is just awesome, two thumbs up!!!!! Your forging skills are good my friend! 

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23 hours ago, Eric McHugh said:

Thanks Wes! I realize I may go a bit overboard.  I should probably take Owen's advice go with "as forged."  I do like Owen's "as forged" look...in fact, my main beveling hammer is one of his dog face hammers with a forged finish. Love it.

For me, I'm trying to find my own path with the finish and shaping.  The only problem (and this is applies to other axe makers) is the customers do not appreciate the work.  To most an axe is just an axe.  There is little understanding about what goes into these things.  Sometimes I spend twice the amount of time forging and shaping an axe head than I do a blade, but I can only get a fraction of the price.  At times, I feel like a business moron spending so many manhours on these axes.  Regardless, I'm going to forge (pun intended) ahead along my path. ;-) When it's all said and done, it makes me feel satisfied artistically to do these things. 

Honestly, that doesn't surprise me.  People have a narrow grasp of what is actually difficult to do and what is not and are easily impressed by flash. 

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+1 on the wrought. Its great. Where did you get it from and what was the starting size for that stock, if you don't mind me asking. 

Getting wrought in Australia is like trying to buy hens teeth. :( 

Great job on the axe, huge fan!!! 

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5 hours ago, Chris C-S said:

+1 on the wrought. Its great. Where did you get it from and what was the starting size for that stock, if you don't mind me asking. 

Getting wrought in Australia is like trying to buy hens teeth. :( 

Great job on the axe, huge fan!!! 

From a 19th century farm in rural Wisconsin.  It was silo banding.  They demo'd the silo and the guy was selling the wrought iron.  I want to say it was 4" wide by 3/8" - 1/2" thick or there abouts.

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On 08/05/2017 at 2:22 AM, Eric McHugh said:

When it's all said and done, it makes me feel satisfied artistically to do these things. 

 

and right there is the "itch" and the "scratch" ;)

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Beautiful work, Eric. I read on your site that the whole axe weighs 1.4 pounds-- that puts the head at somewhere around 13 ounces, right? 

For the record, I deeply appreciate the way you finish your axes; the last one you posted inspired me to put a bit more effort into my own, instead of just leaving them full of hammer dings all the time.  I think folks expect a low level of finish on working axes because that's what those fancy European axe companies do-- hammer marks are a high-end feature don'tcha know! 

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