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working knives with sheaths


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Hello Everyone,

I here are some knives I made for a break between swords. They are 80CrV2, except for the pattern welded one. It is 1075, W2, and just 2 layers of 15N20.

These are meant for serious use, and are made accordingly. The wharncliffes are 3" (micarta) and 3.2" (curly oak stained with aqua fortis). That curly oak is just plain awesome. I have enough of this to make scale for 5 more knives, at least. I love it.

 

The clip point is 5" (blade), and has green micarta.

 

The puukko-like knife has curly oak also stained with AF, but from a different tree. It is also beautiful, but a little less gold and purple/black and more brown. AF on oak usually gives both of these colors (gold, and purple/black). It is a great trick, and curly oak is not that expensive.

final 4 working knives in sheaths.JPG

 

final curly oak working knife with sheath.JPG

final black and green with sheath.JPGfinal handle closeup puukko like.JPGfinal puukko like with sheath pweld.JPGfinal pweld puukko like blade view.JPGfinal pweld puukko like with hamon.JPGfinal wharncliffe curly oak .JPGgreen micarta clip point 1.jpggreen micarta clip point 2 with sheath.jpgfull length pukko like pweld knife.jpg

full length pukko like pweld knife.jpg

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these are the first two knives I have ever made with micarta handles. I never use it because I usually make swords. But, I already had someone order 2 of the clip point only with a shorter blade. So... I guess people like them.

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26 minutes ago, Kevin (The Professor) said:

these are the first two knives I have ever made with micarta handles. I never use it because I usually make swords. But, I already had someone order 2 of the clip point only with a shorter blade. So... I guess people like them.

I'm a keep it subtle kind of guy, and I am seriously rough on tools, so micarta is perfect. A sub-4" blade for that clip point would move it way up my list for sure. It's sexy, but way too scary to wear while cooking breakfast for the AARP crowd.

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Kevin,

some nice looking knives, I remember some of them when they were being worked but when did you do the patternweld one?

btw, you leather work is improving! lol

 

R

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Nice work professor! I really like these. Those wharncliff blades look like excellent users for the garden/orchard work. I really like that clip point. Looks like a good working blade and is a very serviceable size. But, that puukko (sp?) blade......well that is the best of the bunch right there. Really nice lines. I love the wood grain and the simple yet elegant form. Well done sir!

Now about those sheaths...........

Here are a couple of tips for getting a simple sheath to look the best it can. 

Stitching: A groover and a wheel spacer go a long way to getting the stitches looking clean and uniform. Once you set the groover and cut the groove, run the wheel through it. This leaves a little dimple where each hole goes. Now take a 5/64" drill bit and using your grinder (I use the disc) and a fine belt (220 or finer). Chuck the drill bit in a cordless drill, put the drill in reverse, turn the grinder on and put a nice tapered point on that bit. Now put the bit in a drill press and drill through the sheath (all three layers) at each dimple. The 5/64" hole fits a 000 Harness needle and waxed thread really well.

 

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Joshua, thanks for the info. I am also glad that you like the knives. It is fun to do simple ones sometimes.

 

Thanks for taking the time to try and help me learn leatherwork. I need it, and appreciate it. The thing is, I did all those things on the sheaths. The reason you don't see the groove is because the sheaths are double-stitched. So, there are no gaps between holes that aren't filled with thread. Except, I just used a regular drill bit to drill the holes.

Ricky - I made that blade years ago, and I have used that knife myself. I didn't want to sell it for a long time. I like it a lot.

thanks. Yes, you saw three of these in process. Same ones.

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The puukko style one is definitely my favorite, but they all look nice, and the leatherwork is not too shabby, either! Nice job, Kevin!

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thanks Noah. You know that I fought against leatherwork, so those are like sheaths 9-13 for me.

kc

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I couldn't tell you which of the oaks I like best.  Both different, but both pretty appealing.  As far as blades go, personally I'd go for the clip point.  To my eye, you nailed the proportions on that one.  The micarta looks good, but with the oak would be better B).  

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Give me your address, Jerrod, I will send you the clip point. I still owe you for the anvil.

kc

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yep, each of those pins were peened on it. It lives in a little dead space on my workbench, just at the edge of the area I do all my hand work.

 

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I really like low layer Damascus, the puuko is sweet, and the clip point knives look powerful to me. 

I didnt like wharncliffe blades until I made one for myself, those things can cut! The one with the oak will be a champion for sure.

oak is fantastic, it has a lot of character. I think people don't like it because it's cheap, my dad has used it for several banjo necks  and he has been told that it would warp too much, he told me you just have to pick the right piece of wood.

im living at my friends ranch and there are oaks everywhere, half of them got sick and died so I go out and cut the burls from them sometimes, most of the burls are hollow or rotten but I might end up with a few knife handles. I like going up in the trees with my giant turning saw and a big knife anyways so I'm not losing anything if I don't get a good burl.

but geez, that curly wood is everywhere, the tree trunks are usually pretty split up but there are nice thick branches just hanging in this hot Texas air to dry.  

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Steven, stain it with aqua fortis and then hit it with a low flame to get it to turn golden brown. Just get ferric nitrate crystals and dissolve them in water until the solution is saturated, and wipe that onto the wood just before you whisker it when sanding. Then, hit with a small propane torch, and finally fill the grain with tung oil. It takes a long time to fill the grain. After the grain is full put 2 or 3 more coats. I will explain more if you want, but you probably already know.

 

Look on youtube for grain-filling oil finish.

 

kc 

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+1 for the Pukko (ish) knife. Looks great. second fav is that clip point as per everyone else's comments. 

Good job. I like to see knives others make. As i am a rookie at this all though dimension/thicknesses and starting material sizes helps me visualise the processes and proportions better. Any chance of you giving those out for the Pukko? 

Thanks in advance. 

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